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June 19 2006

Superman/Batman #26 sells est. 118,821 copies. Superman/Batman #26, the Sam Loeb tribute issue, came in 10th in Quantity Ranking and 4th in Retail Rank with an estimated 118,821 issues sold.

In Angel related comics, Angel Spotlight Illyria One Shot came in 159th, Spike vs Dracula #3 came in 162th, Angel Spotlight Gunn One Shot came in 170th, and Spike Lost & Found One Shot came in 188th.

Spike Vs. Dracula #3 came in at 162,not 156.

[ edited by Buffyfantic on 2006-06-19 20:16 ]
The 153.8 is the rank index rather then the number sold, its a silly system.. this actually means that it sold the number of copies of Batman x 1.538 . Which is unfortunatly a bit lower then 153,800 copies :(
Let's not forget that Astonishing X-Men 15 comes out on Wednesday!
I've changed the link to where the estimated sales figures are shown and not just the rank index and changed the subject line to show the proper estimated figures.
Big month for DC. Really curious to see if 52 will stay up as high as this for long.

(And the Serenity TP sold another estimated 1,499 copies, too. #75 in graphic novels.)

Also in stores this Wednesday: Angel: Old Friends TP, Angel: Th Curse--Cover Gallery, Angel Scriptbook #4. Big week for Whedonical comics.
Question: I was in a comic book store yesterday and the clerk mentioned that Joss and Cassaday don't get royalties off the trade paperbacks of Astonishing X-Men like they do with the individual issues. Is this true? If it is, I hate to not support them by buying all of the past individual issues but I can't carry them around like I can a TP. They're just not as durable.
Browncoat, just buy both that's what I do.
Browncoat, I sincerely doubt that is the case--maybe in the past, when TPs were something that only rarely happened, there was no mention of them in contracts, but these days...?

I *know* DC pays TP royalties. Don't recall any specific mention of it anywhere for Marvel, but what the one does...

It seems very unlikely TPs wouldn't be included in whatever royalty agreements exist.
I was going to say, because it doesn't seem logical that both author and artist would sign any agreement cutting them out of something like the TPs, especially since they are still comics with their names.
Also Angel Scriptbook came in at number 286 and sold 3,067 copies.
I'm neither a Superman nor a Batman fan, but I did enjoy the tribute issue, which I ordered specially from TFAW. I thought each writer did a terrific job of delivering two pages that were both in tune with the characters and the other pages, but that also sounded like the writer's own voice. And the art was smashing too.
Elsewhere, certain people are gloating that the IDW Illyria and Gunn One-Shots outsold the third Spike one-shot, which somehow "proves" that Spike isn't popular and Spike comics don't sell. But the Spike one-shot was more of a graphic novel than a standard comic, selling for $7.49 (according to the link above), while the Illyria and Gunn comics were standard comic-sized and sold for $3.99. Aren't higher-priced comics and graphic novels expected to sell less? Anybody know?
And the art was smashing too.

Except for that god awful Rob Leifeld page. Tore me right out of the story. Fantastic book, the first, and probably only, single I've bought, and will buy, for a long long time.
The fact that people are arguing over the difference of a 1000 copies sold is hysterically funny. The IDW comics aren't what you would call major sellers in the comic book world. But to answer your question, yes cheaper comics would sell more.

And the real reason why the Illyria one-shot did so well? Peter David wrote it. And he's quite hot in the comic book world right now.
"Peter David wrote it. And he's quite hot in the comic book world right now."

And deservedly so. :-)
Elsewhere, certain people are gloating that the IDW Illyria and Gunn One-Shots outsold the third Spike one-shot, which somehow "proves" that Spike isn't popular and Spike comics don't sell. But the Spike one-shot was more of a graphic novel than a standard comic, selling for $7.49 (according to the link above), while the Illyria and Gunn comics were standard comic-sized and sold for $3.99. Aren't higher-priced comics and graphic novels expected to sell less? Anybody know?
deanna b | June 20, 04:54 CET


Well,I don't see that any different then when elsewhere,certain people gloat when something Spike centric is made or does well and using that as "proof" that Spike is the most popular and sells the best.To me that is just as petty.And I'm not saying Spike isn't popular or doesn't sell well,just that this is no different and does go on at other places.

Also the two Angel miniseries by Jeff Marriote and Spike vs. Dracula,also by PAD are standard comic-sized and sell for $3.99.The Spike:Asylum series will be that format as well.

[ edited by Buffyfantic on 2006-06-20 18:16 ]
I have never understood the need to play the "My Character Can Beat Your Character" game.

When I came to the web to research BtVS, it was already off the air. At first, when I heard that the writers and fans used to interact on the boards, I was sad that I had missed that experience. Then I read some of the rhetoric out there and reconsidered...and remembered why I have never been very comfortable in fandom of any kind.

So may I just say, "Any of the characters are better than none of the characters."

I feel better now.
I'd have to disagree on one count. "Buffy" is where it's at! :)

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