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June 30 2007

List of Lists. "We are a nation that loves to live by lists." This is a collection of completely random and totally subjective lists. Spike, Angel and Firefly mentions.

[ edited by zeitgeist on 2007-06-30 16:12 ]

But they missed Giles under "Great Uses of Glasses in TV or Movies".
No glockenspiel in rock'n'roll? The Ramones' "Bonzo Goes to Bitburg" begs to differ.
Added period at the end of the link title.
Holy crap, that was fun.
Some thoughts:
Angel should be before Spike.
Funny that Fastlane replaced Firefly, but is also on the list, but lower ranked (as if it means anything).
"She's the Man" is based on Shakespeare's "the Twelth Night" and although it seems bad on the outside, is a pretty ridiculously fun and clever movie that should have made the list.
On the list of strange town names, they got Gnaw Bone, Indiana (20 miles from my house),
but missed Larry Bird's Hometown of French Lick, Indiana (35 miles from my house. :)

-In case you're wondering, I live right next to a small spot in the road called Handy, Indiana lol


-

[ edited by TDBrown on 2007-06-30 19:14 ]
As for the bests uses of pi:
3.141592 Remember the gender of the word "nombre" (through "Que j'aime a faire connaitre UN nombre utile aux sages").

(Yeah, I know, rather strange use of pi, but it works).

[ edited by Celebithil on 2007-06-30 20:24 ]
we are a FANDOM that loves to live by lists :)
Added period at the end of the link title.

See, one man can make a difference zeitgeist. You're just like Knightrider ;).

That is the most totally random collection of mad randomicity i've seen in a while, love it (I used to have a 'Book of Lists' that was based on the same idea, which, in dangerously recursive fashion, appears on here as 'The New Book of Lists').

(one minor quibble though: if you have fruit in your full English breakfast you are, most definitely, doing it wrong ;)
That was so fun, why do we love this stuff so much? Observations:

So dissagree with CaptainB that Angel should be before Spike :)

ASH not on the "best use of glasses in a TV show or movie"? How can that be??

Firefly should be #1, but My So Called Life should be #2.

"'80's fashion trends we refuse to adopt again": No mention of Big Damned Shoulder Pads? Eeeew, looked good on exactly no one.

Cover songs that transcend the original hit it dead on, except for the one of Baby Got Back, which I've never heard. But I'd bump it anyway, for Sarah McLachlin's cover of Joni Mitchell's "River".

"Cool things to see under water" .... snorkeling in Fiji, I held a Nudibranch in my hand! ("Sea Cucumber" for the aquatically challenged).It squirted a cloudy white liquid out one end when I touched it. Ever try stiffling hysterical laughter while breathing through a snorkel?

Please, British whedonesqers, tell me you don't really eat baked beans and kippers for breakfast? (or with the kippers .... *at all*) And blood sausage? please don't even go there :)
Course, when else would you eat them ? ;)

A typical full English: fried eggs(s), sausages, few rashers of bacon, black-pudding, baked-beans, fried toast, maybe hash-browns, mug of tea (obviously). In Scotland you might get Haggis with it and possibly white-pudding too.

(we call 'blood sausage' 'black-pudding', makes it easier to forget you're eating a slice of congealed pig's blood ;)
Can I just say .......eeeeeww .... and thank the goddess and god and all the lords of Kobol that I'm a freakin' vegetarian:)
I had not noticed the municipalities list. I guess all the Pennsylvania towns like Fertility, Intercourse and Bird in the Hand are just too well known at this point to make the list.

My dad had me eating blood sausage when I was a kid. I remember it as being pretty good. Now I just cannot bring myself to eat it. ...and I give my son grief for tasting things with his eyes. Hypocrisy, thy name is Mom. ;-)
In Scotland you might have Lorne sausage instead of your traditional, erm, sausage shaped ones.
Please, British whedonesqers, tell me you don't really eat baked beans and kippers for breakfast?


Two words. Ulster fry.
Actually, having had the traditional British breakfast at a few English-themed pubs in the L.A. area, despite how strange it sounds, most of it's pretty darned good. Never had the kippers, though, and only tried the black pudding once (didn't dislike it, but not overly anxious to try it again). But British Heinz beans on toast = yum, and you can't beat lemon curd on a crumpet.

Meanwhile, Spike and Angel, best vamps on TV, yay. And here's to the Count as the number three, THREE vampire.
Lorne sausage ? Is that like square slice ? 'Lorne' sounds a bit posh, bet that's what they call it in Edinburgh ;).

But British Heinz beans on toast = yum ...

Always tickles me to find out about the little differences. You guys seriously don't have 'beans on toast' in the US ? What do students live on over there ? ;)

Two words. Ulster fry.

Hah, only in the UK would folk compete to see who's breakfast is most likely to put you in an early grave. Full Scottish all the way, obviously (don't make me go nuclear and bring out the deep fried you-know-what Simon ;).
"Lorne sausage ? Is that like square slice ? 'Lorne' sounds a bit posh, bet that's what they call it in Edinburgh"

What a cheek. A bit posh indeed. I shall tell my mum and dad you said that :-)
Thanks for the link Spikeylover. Fun Stuff.

The Vampire list was perfect except I'd give Spike the most beautiful as well.

And the '80s fashion list is seriously off. They forgot to mention the hideous shoulder pads, and frankly all the teenaged boys I know are back to wearing the skinny jeans, and making it work.

And use of glasses? Giles of course.
This thread is really scaring me. "Lorne sausage"?? OK, not going there, way too obvious:)

And Xane .... right there with you, Spike would definitely get my vote as "most beautiful vampire ever".
Also about the big-assed shoulder pads. Almost as eeeew worthy as blood sausage.

I guess I lead a sheltered life, food wise, in a place where there are as many Health Food Stores as regular supermarkets. I'll happily stick to my organic bran flakes with organic milk & maybe a rasberry yogurt, for breakfast.
"But British Heinz beans on toast = yum ...

Always tickles me to find out about the little differences. You guys seriously don't have 'beans on toast' in the US ?


Um, well, Heinz beans on toast? Like straight out of the can? I don't eat baked beans out of the can for lunch or dinner, much less breakfast, without doctoring them up first. On the other hand, my mother is from Oklahoma (That is in the middle of the US, just North of Texas.) and she will always talk about how one of her favorite sandwiches as a kid was baked beans. It was apparently also what her mother used to give the homeless men who would come by looking for a handout during the depression. Where I was raised is not baked beans country, however. That is why people always ask us to bring baked beans to their cook outs, cause the old family recipe is awfully good. I guess I should try them on bread next time I make them...but not for breakfast. ;-)
Baked beans, heat in pan, put on toast. Beans on toast.
Saje, i agree with you about the full Scottish, but only up in the North-East where we would, on occasions, substitute the toast with rowies.
Baked beans and toast are not complete without HP sauce
And I love scones and marmalade
So there
... but only up in the North-East where we would, on occasions, substitute the toast with rowies.

Was up hiking the Speyside way last year and a few of the B&Bs did rowies. Tasty but you can almost feel the years falling off as you eat ;).

(for those that've not had the pleasure, a rowie is a bit like a heavy, salty bread roll designed by someone with a pathological hatred of healthy hearts - lots of butter in the mix ;)

And yep, HP with everything but it does work well with beans on toast. Never liked marmalade though, don't really like peel (so most fruit cake's out too).
You anticipated the rowies question, but what is HP sauce?

Now you guys have me thinking. It seems like I should remember baked beans being served at breakfast, even though I was only over there for 2 weeks 12 years ago. All I remember is the black pudding and the ubiquitous grilled tomato showing up at every breakfast. ...and falling in love with both clotted cream and hard cider.
HP sauce = 'Houses of Parliament' sauce (maybe it was invented there ?). It's a brown sauce with the consistency of tomato ketchup made with vinegar and various spices, fruits etc. mixed in. As with Jaffa Cakes, there're a few variants around now like Chili or BBQ flavour (of HP not Jaffa Cakes, that'd be weird ;) but the original is still the best IMO.

(grilled tomato - bleaargh. Not a fan ;)
sigh...Jaffa Cakes...now you're doing this on purpose. I know people have mentioned them before but I just don't remember what they are.

HP sauce sounds like A-1 steak sauce.

Even though I am not usually one for the sweet version of things, I generally don't like English marmalade but love the sweeter version that I'm guessing is American. Have you tried both, Saje

Oh, and I guess I'm hungry because it just occurred to me that baked beans and cornbread is quite wonderful. Now you have me thinking I may have to do a traditional 4th of July thing with baked beans, burgers, corn on the cob and watermelon but make enough baked beans to have them later with cornbread...which is one of my favorite things for breakfast...the cornbread, not the beans...as already established. ;-)

Oh yeah, I missed asking before, what is ulster fry?
Oops, sorry. Jaffa Cakes actually appear in Buffy (someone does a food run and Giles goes 'Ooh, Jaffa Cakes" and proceeds to stuff his face - not sure which episode but it's S6 or 7) so I just assumed you guys had them over there. They're biscuits (i.e. cookies ;) with a layer of chocolate on a sponge base and a sort of orange (hence the 'Jaffa') jelly (not the US word for jam, the other kind, more like what you guys call jello) stuff inside. Only, technically not biscuits (hence the 'cakes') due to an arcane point of UK tax law - basically we pay VAT (sales tax) on chocolate covered biscuits because they're considered a luxury non-essential but not on any cakes or non-chocolate biscuits (no I don't get it either) so McVities, who make 'Jaffa Cakes', actually went to court to have them defined as cakes rather than biscuits (so they wouldn't have to add the tax and so could sell them more cheaply). Obvious really ;-).

Don't think i've tried US marmalade but isn't sweet marmalade basically just jam (but with added evil peel) ?

(and an 'Ulster fry' is just a fried breakfast as eaten in Ulster i.e. Northern Ireland. Though you can get a fried breakfast - or 'fry up', hence the 'fry' - everywhere in the UK, each country/region will have its own variation so in Scotland you might get rowies and/or Haggis and/or white-pudding - like your 'blood sausage' without the blood - as well as the standard eggs, bacon etc., in Wales you may well get laverbread with it - made from seaweed but nicer than that might sound - and in Ulster, well, i've never been so don't really know. If only we had a real live Ulster-man kicking around ... ;)
In the US, jelly (the wiggly smooth stuff you put on toast) is jelly. Jam is smooth though grainy. Marmalade has peel in it but for some reason the American version is not bitter. Preserves have large pieces of fruit in it. Jello is flavored gelatin that people eat for dessert and sometimes add fruit or marshmellows to (as was mentioned in BtVS once.)

I do remember Giles saying that about Jaffa cakes, but I always figured they had a specialty store in Sunnydale that sold British food stuffs like Wheat-a-bits, which we also do not have that I know of.
AFAIK, jam is jam is jam over here, we don't distinguish between jam with seeds, bits of fruit etc. and without but the stuff in Jaffa Cakes is closer to jelly (your jello) anyway (though it's denser than you'd normally eat as dessert e.g. with ice-cream). Though most would never call jam 'jelly' over here, growing up I used to have "jeely pieces" in Scotland (where 'piece' is an informal/slang word for sandwich) so there must've been some cross-over at one point (dunno how an 'E' replaced the first 'L' though).

And, assuming we both mean the wheat based breakfast cereal, it's actually 'Weetabix' and they do, indeed, taste great crumbled up in milk (not sure about blood ;) though there's also the "eat 'em quick before they go soggy" school of thought. These people should not be trusted, they are maniacs of the first water ;).
We have a ton of wheat-based cereals, so the dialog may have been written between Spike and Giles as British shorthand for wheat cereal to emphasize their growing familiarity as well as their mutual Britishness. Interesting.

People here usually pour the milk over the cereal rather than crumble things in the milk. I am an oddity (Hey, no comments.) in that I do not like anything floating in my milk. The "stays crunchy in milk" however, is a marketing thing for some cereal or another so I guess that particular group are on both sides of the Atlantic.

So Jaffa cakes have a spongy bottom, a layer of orange jello and chocolate on top? Jello wrestling jokes are trying to corrupt this post, but I won't go there. I will reserve judgement on how tasty they sound, however.

If everything is called jam, how do you know what you are getting?

There are many American names for things and expressions that came from Britian and stayed while they changed in the original area. Fall for Autumn is the most commonly used example. I looked up jelly to see if that was the same and this is what I found,

"Etymology: Middle English gelly, from Anglo-French gelee, from feminine of gelé, past participle of geler to freeze, congeal, from Latin gelare"

Another source cited a written example from 1381.

I'm going to take a wild guess that everything gelatinous was jelly and it split from there. Interestingly the dictionary I looked in had the etymology of jam as unknown. The fruit spread definition is thought to have begun as an off shoot of the "to crush" use. The first written use is cited as in the 1730's so it looks like jelly was the word before jam took over. Obviously you Brits just go with the latest thing. ;-)
British marmalade is sweet too - at least the stuff I buy is (total sugar content 65g per 100g apparently).

"People here usually pour the milk over the cereal rather than crumble things in the milk." I don't know anyone who crumbles things into milk for breakfast so I think the British American Spike is just trying to confuse.
Oh, we're hip, no messing newcj ;).

People here usually pour the milk over the cereal rather than crumble things in the milk.

Yeah, here too. Weetabix come as dry sort of 'bricks' though so they lend themselves to crumbling in the hand (even then you'd normally just put them in a bowl and pour milk over as you would with any other cereal - I used to crumble them as a kid but that's just kids playing with their food). If the liquid was the food though (as with Spike's blood) and the weetabix was just for texture you'd crumble it in so you could control exactly how much you used.

If everything is called jam, how do you know what you are getting?

Well, we know we're getting jam ;). Dunno, look in the jar before buying or in the pot before eating ? You'll sometimes see "Whole Fruit" on jars with big bits.

(the OED has a cite which seems to think it might be a corruption of "j'aime" as in "I love it" possibly uttered by children upon tasting. I agree jelly was probably first BTW, because i'dve thought marrowbone jelly was around before jam)

And moley75, sure marmalade has a lot of sugar in it, that's what acts as the preservative (hence 'preserve' ;) but i've never tasted any that didn't also have a bitter tang to it. That, to me, is what separates it from jam (i'd assumed newcj meant 'no tang just sweet' so commented to the effect that that's "basically just jam" - might have been a tad over-literal, wouldn't be the first time ;).

ETA: Oops, just saw where newcj says "not bitter" so I wasn't actually over-literal (for a change ;), I was, in fact, just literal enough ;).

[ edited by Saje on 2007-07-03 21:23 ]
"i'dve thought marrowbone jelly was around before jam"

Exactly.

" I don't know anyone who crumbles things into milk for breakfast"

Thank you moley75 I was mislead by this comment by Saje.

"they do, indeed, taste great crumbled up in milk "

What do we think; accidental or a clever way to have a laugh at the Yank's expense? ;-)

I remember the first time I got hold of some British marmalade. I was a kid and was so excited because I loved marmalade and it was something that was not usually available at home. I took a big bite and Yuck. I was soooo disappointed. Now I have this strong urge to send Saje a jar of American marmalade, to see what he thinks. I've never sent foodstuffs overseas though.
Not sure it's even legal, ta though ;). I'm tempted to do a bit of scouting around cos I think there're companies that sell US food over here (found one that sells 'A1 Steak Sauce' for instance after your HP comment piqued my curiosity).

What do we think; accidental or a clever way to have a laugh at the Yank's expense? ;-)

As if i'd do that ;-). Nah, I seriously used to crumble them as a kid. Even now, though I put them in a bowl and pour milk on, I still "smoodge" them around afterwards so that I end up with a sort of 'Weetabix porridge' rather than discrete 'bricks' (i.e. to achieve the same effect as crumbling) and I know a few people that eat them that way (though, clearly, I don't know moley75 ;). Prefer cornflakes anyway (has to be Kellogg's, there is no substitute ;).
Oops double post. I even know what I did wrong. Bad me.

[ edited by newcj on 2007-07-04 16:02 ]
5 pounds for a bottle of A1 steak sauce?!?! Yikes. Believe me, it is not worth it. Admittedly I take after my Dad in the tight with a buck category, but since he always blamed it on his Scottish heritage (with a smile) I would hate to be responsible for leading you astray. ;-)

"I used to crumble them as a kid but that's just kids playing with their food). If the liquid was the food though (as with Spike's blood) and the weetabix was just for texture you'd crumble it in so you could control exactly how much you used."

Or, they are using it to indicate that in some ways Spike is seriously immature. It was after all early in the introduction of Spike as a regular member of the cast.

"I still "smoodge" them around afterwards so that I end up with a sort of 'Weetabix porridge'"

Yeah, okay. Sounds...um...great. Of course I'm one who likes yogurt on her cereal so I really can't point fingers. ...and no that is not normal in America, it is just me and a few other people who have tried it when I said it was good. That kind of corruption, my conscience can handle. ;-)

After seeing the price of A1, I am leery about you tracking down American orange marmalade. If you are going to try to hunt it down, I guess I could give you a description, however. In my experience it is usually lighter in color, often a pale yellow, and has less peel. It has a slight sourness to go with the sweet, but is not bitter. If it is too expensive, just wait for that trip to the States you have planned. ;-)
Heh, mine's fond of saying he's not tight he's just frugal ;).

Or, they are using it to indicate that in some ways Spike is seriously immature.

Good point. Or maybe not exactly 'immature' but 'simple' (as in straightforward) which for all his poetic insight he seemed to be, certainly regarding food etc. (he took a simple, almost childlike pleasure in e.g. Onion flowers and whereas Angel sometimes seemed like something of a connoisseur Spike was definitely more a Jack and coke or beer type of guy). I guess part of the vampire metaphor is a sort of permanent young adulthood and corresponding emotional 'inexperience' though so you're onto something I reckon.

And trust me, "smoodging"'s the way forward. Remember my words when everyone's doing it ;).

(and my uncle used to have natural yoghurt and honey on his cereal - may still do - so it's not unheard of. He lives in Edinburgh though so, y'know, allowances have to be made ;)
I knew there was a reason I liked Edinburgh, besides, you know, what it looked like and how interesting it was. ;-)

"Heh, mine's fond of saying he's not tight he's just frugal ;)."

Yes, the word frugal was used in our house on occasion. My dad gave credit to his frugal nature for being one of the few of his generation not to smoke. He just could not bring himself to spend money on something that he was going to burn for no real reason. So a case could be made for a frugal nature being healthier... well in that case anyway.

"Or maybe not exactly 'immature' but 'simple' (as in straightforward) which for all his poetic insight he seemed to be, certainly regarding food etc. (he took a simple, almost childlike pleasure in e.g. Onion flowers and whereas Angel sometimes seemed like something of a connoisseur Spike was definitely more a Jack and coke or beer type of guy)."

One could say that Angel was looking for subtlety in everything whereas Spike was, as you say, more straightforward in his approach. Even his poetry was fairly straightforward. It was not something that would need to be studied endlessly to try to figure out the meaning. On the other hand, I don't remember Angel ever adding things to his animal blood to try to make it more interesting. Probably part of his self punishment mentality. So Spike was more straightforward but would actually experiment more with his own particular "cuisine." Maybe it was Angelus who was the connoisseur while Spike was the guy who tries mixing the two dips together that were left after the party was over. (Hmmm dip.)

"And trust me, "smoodging"'s the way forward. Remember my words when everyone's doing it ;). "

Since the readers of this thread may be the only ones on this side of the Atlantic who have a clue as to what "smoodging" is, you might want to make that clear before you start suggesting people over here start doing it. We don't want people to start doing anything to frighten the horses, after all. ;-)
This is hilarious. I expected a heated debate here about people's personal lists. The last thing I expected was UK breakfast menus.

Southeastern US traditional: grits (best with cheese), eggs, bacon or sausage, toast. Could be hash browns instead of grits, too. Sweet cardiac arrest.

I thought the Weetabix dialogue was funny because it was Spike annoying Giles in that special way only he can. Spike generally seems to enjoy eating as kind of a sport.
I think grits are best with butter salt and pepper, so take that Sunfire!
They're also good that way.
Well, we can probably get heated about breakfast. Err, waffles suck ! And what kinds of maniacs eat pancakes for breakfast anyway ?! ... Nothing ? Not even a bit angry ? OK, maybe not then ;-).

Ah, grits. I found out what they were a few years back when I hung around on Slashdot (they used to have a meme over there about covering various things in hot grits). Sort of like porridge, right ?

(don't actually like porridge much. Nor whisky for that matter - blended anyway, don't mind a nice single malt every now and again. It's a wonder they don't revoke my Scottish passport ;-)

Maybe it was Angelus who was the connoisseur while Spike was the guy who tries mixing the two dips together that were left after the party was over.

Thinking about it, I reckon you were right the first time newcj. Angel's not just a connoisseur, he's actually old fashioned with it whereas Spike has kept his playfulness, his childlike experimentation, in fact he's constructed a persona that's totally centred on rejecting the old fashioned and stodgy (he is, literally, a 'young' punk). Angelus (as opposed to Angel) is somewhere in between, being a bit of a traditionalist but also maintaining his sense of whimsy (OK, evil whimsy but still ...).

You're also right about dip ;).
Evil whimsy was what made Glory special. There should be a list of characters with evil whimsy.

Hmm I think grits are technically the corn version of porridge. Is porridge the same as oatmeal?
Boy ya' can't find an argument on this thread any way at all. I admire your restraint in the face of my obvious attempt to enrage you, Sunfire.

...though waffles are yummy and it is maniacs with good taste who eat pancakes for breakfast...or any other time as well.

No you're right, Saje. Breakfast just doesn't inspire the same fire as...well...I won't go there. I don't really want a fight.

We actually don't use the word porridge except in old nursery rhymes. (Peas porridge hot, peas porridge cold, peas porridge in the pot 9 days old. ...and people wonder why British food has such a bad reputation. ;-) ) I've been told that your porridge is our oatmeal, so grits could be one of the corn versions with corn meal mush (not that common anymore) as another version. (Using "corn" in the American sense of the word, not as just a grain.) It has a fine grainy texture, looking like Farina or Cream of Wheat though not tasting anything like them. It is usually a side dish, however, rather than something you eat as the main part of the meal. In the South it can be served at every meal without a raised eyebrow to be seen. In the North you won't find it anywhere except the supermarket and my pantry.

Oh, and going back to the list, I have to say I like scones, I mean they are just another form of bread/roll/American bicuit/etc.. What's not to like about bread/rolls/American biscuits/etc.?

ETA Sunfire beat me on the porridge thing. I really should not let myself be interrupted by life when I am posting.

[ edited by newcj on 2007-07-05 22:55 ]
Bloody life ;). Yep sunfire (and newcj), porridge is made from oats so i'd say it's the same as oatmeal. There's also 'semolina' which is usually eaten sweetened with various things added (e.g. jam) as dessert (think it's made from wheat, a friend at work's allergic to gluten and can't have it).

And cream scones (with a dollop of jam) are probably the inspiration for ambrosia (or should've been), truly the food of the gods.

We actually don't use the word porridge except in old nursery rhymes.

Hah, we do use the word (obviously) except in old nursery rhymes (it's "Peas pudding hot .." over here or the version I learned was anyway. Funny old world ;).

There should be a list of characters with evil whimsy.

Hmm...

Glory
Angelus
Vamp Willow
Ethan Rayne ?

... coming up empty.
Oh, I didn't mean I was disappointed there wasn't an argument here, just surprised.

I was trying to think of characters total-- not just Whedonverse. I had some vague memory of liking a whimsically evil villain or two a lot but I'm still not remembering anything specific. I don't think I ever really liked the Joker in Batman. It'll come to me randomly days from now.
"Oh, I didn't mean I was disappointed there wasn't an argument here, just surprised.",

Yeah, just funnin'. I've been in a whimsical mood lately...and sometimes evil.

It seems like most of the villians in Batman had whimsey. Maybe because the good guy was so dour.

Did Glory have whimsey though? I can't think of an example.

Angelus, Vamp Willow and Ethan Raine, absolutely.

I'll have to think to come up with others.

Ow. That hurts.

Maybe later.

"it's "Peas pudding hot .." over here or the version I learned was anyway. Funny old world ;)."

It is funny considering how long ago pease got corrupted to pea. But then it makes sense that a really old nursery rhyme would have multiple versions. Just the other day a woman from Texas used the expression between a rock and a hard spot and I had to stop her because that is how I was raised with the expression at home. Outside the house everyone always said rock and a hard place. So I finally know it is regional, not just my family. Pudding/porridge may have been the same, or pudding might be the later version. Our definition of pudding is different from yours after all. ...and now that I think of it, you make pudding out of peas? Good grief!

You don't eat it for breakfast, do you?

[ edited by newcj on 2007-07-06 03:07 ]
Whereas, making porridge out of peas is OK ? ;-)

And if you can eat it, someone over here will have had it for breakfast, anything's suitable for trying. Except pancakes ;).

(mostly "between a rock and a hard place" here though as a kid I remember "between the devil and the deep blue sea" being another common phrase, meaning the same thing)

Ah, evil whimsy from anything ?

Lex Luthor (in the films)
The Joker (he's gotta be in there)
The Master (recent incarnations - from 'Doctor Who')
John Doe (from 'Se7en')

... must be loads more but i'm blanking.
My understanding was that pease porridge was called pea soup now. Not something I like, but reasonable just the same. Pudding though?

"And if you can eat it, someone over here will have had it for breakfast, anything's suitable for trying."

Well, yeah. That's a given anywhere...and my brother would probably be one of the ones who did. ;-)

"Except pancakes ;)."

I - will - not - be - tempted.

Can you have the Joker and not have the Riddler? ...or was he just in the TV show?

I was thinking Lex Luthor from the movies but was so tired I forgot he could be distinguished from the comic books. (Yeah a little tired.)

Have not seen the Master from Dr. Who or John Doe from Se7en.

The Master from BtVS actually had a strange sort of whimsey, "There is something in your eye."

But I'm blanking otherwise as well.
Glory would always have a serious "I am an awesome hellgod" or "I must find the Key" moment but then get momentarily distracted by an idea that was terribly violent but just kind of amusing to her.

Ex: "My name will be on everyone's lips... assuming they haven't been torn off."

It could have been just a pure threateningly evil line, completely serious, but she'd deliver it like it was just a neat image to her. Serious about doing it but amused by the idea.

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