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November 20 2007

(SPOILER) New Cloverfield Trailer Online. The Drew Goddard penned/JJ Abrams produced monster movie is coming soon and here is the high res trailer to combat the bootlegged one out there.

Oh, and the title seems to really be "Cloverfield".

Cheers, Andy Dufresne. That looks fucking awesome.
Apple has it in various sizes, including HD.
gossi, let me second that with "That looks fu*king awesome!" Gotta get me some "Cloverfield". Whoo-hoo!
That looks very slightly amazingly frikkin' cool.

On a personal note though, I hope it's short cos all the wobbling will probably make me feel sick. Got it at Blair Witch too (not being sick was the best part of that entire film ;).
I thought the trailer wicked. although i personally don't like watching movies/shows that are completely handheld and shakey (at least not to this extent). I don't think I could sit through a feature length movie like that.
Gonna be the best monster movie ever, I think and I absolutely love that the reactions to the trailers have been so high. Yeah, it just looks amazing.
So excited abou this! I like that it doesn't have that overly done CGI quality that other movies have, yet too much hand held will make me vomit. I do like the feel of hand held though.
This looks absolutely fantastic. But I'm also worried about the handheld camera thing. Might have to wait for this to hit DVD, to see it on a smaller screen and maybe not get sick. Then again, I might just risk it, because this trailer is making me really excited to see this, just like the last one did. Only maybe even a bit more. Great stuff.
The problems I have with this are largely personal and very much 9/11 related, so while I won't be watching it myself, I hope it does well. It does look pretty spectacular.
What company makes dramamine? I want to invest.
The problems I have with this are largely personal and very much 9/11 related

Yes, I could really live without seeing New York under attack again. Even aside from the reality of 9/11, it's a disaster movie cliche to see panicked people rushing around NY.

The hand-held doesn't bother me when it's done well, but I fear it will be more Blair Witch than the Bourne Ultimatum.
Even aside from the reality of 9/11, it's a disaster movie cliche to see panicked people rushing around NY.

I dunno, I think this is a (possibly deliberate) attempt to reclaim that mind-space crossoverman. It's actually part of the effect of September 11th that people can't look at footage of the twin towers or explosions in a city (especially one with skyscrapers) without thinking about that day - at some point you have to take that power back from the bastards that did it or else they'll have won a (small but not insignificant) victory for all time. Maybe it's still too soon, maybe the time's right.

And New York, though not the capital of the US, is like London in that it's where most people see the heart of the country as residing I think - it has America's 'Big Ben' or Sidney Opera House in the 'Statue of Liberty' i.e. it's more than just another city. Also, more people are at risk when a city's in trouble and more people live in cities so it's easier to identify with. Finalsolly, how many horror films/invasion movies have been set in small towns or the countryside ? Quite a lot I think.

(and sorry TamaraC but motion sickness tablets make me feel, yep, sick ;). Used to get it on everything but planes - usually, there was one "memorable" flight to Holland during a storm - and trains. My solution ? Learn to drive. Been pretty much fine since then, even as a passenger, no idea why - except where some games/films are concerned)
I almost got the feeling that it was a going back to the monster movie roots sort of homage, which usually includes NYC being attacked by giant somethings. I've never been a big monster movie fan, so I will probably pass. At the same time, I'll be routing for it to knock 'em dead at the box office.

On another topic, I think dealing with 9/11 memories is going to be pretty personal and can come without it even being NYC in flames. I just watched Spiderman 3, and though I didn't say anything to anyone, I found the scenes of the crane slicing through the building, uncomfortably reminiscent...I actually found myself getting pretty upset and was immediately aware of why.
I totally agree with Saje. I'm guessing the "America in peril" callbacks are exactly what they want. All great monster movies reflect their culture's sense of danger and paranoia: Godzilla was basically the physical embodiment of the atomic bomb when he first appeared on Japanese screens in 1954, Invasion of the Body Snatchers' (a movie that I'm not crazy about, though I certainly admire it) pod people stood in for the regulation of the McCarthy era, and I'm positive that Cloverfield is going to be mining the United States' fear caused by 9/11, the war in Iraq, etc. Which I am completely for. It's about time this starts getting dealt with intelligently, because besides Fahrenheit 9/11 and some smaller flicks like In the Valley of Elah or the documentary No End in Sight which sadly audiences avoided in droves, movies haven't responded adequately.

As for handheld, it's never bothered me. I love handheld camerawork. Speaking of handheld "War on Terror"-inspired movies, Brian De Palma recently released the flick Redacted, a faux documentary that is supposed to feel like it's all found footage strung together. I'd love to see it.
I saw Redacted on HDNet (they did a special preview deal). It's certainly an interesting experiment, but I'm not sure it's as successful as it wants to be. I think the main problem is that the format calls for many long takes (minutes at a time), which demands a lot from the actors, and some of it ends up having the dynamic of a play, where you expect the usual dynamic of a film. Still, an interesting effort, worth checking out.

I haven't seen this Cloverfield trailer in the theater, but when I saw the first one, I do have to say it was odd sitting through that in NYC, a mile or two from the WTC. It won't keep me from seeing the movie, but I expect that oddness will still be there.
I'm positive that Cloverfield is going to be mining the United States' fear caused by 9/11, the war in Iraq, etc. Which I am completely for. It's about time this starts getting dealt with intelligently,

How is a monster-as-metaphor-for-terrorism invading NY city dealing with this subject intelligently? I think it's pretty heavy-handed and disrespectful.

I happen to think we should be making films about the current political landscape (see: Rendition, for example) - and not movies that continue to spread fear and panic about some foreign menace coming to destroy our cities.
I've not seen the movie, so there's no way I can guage whether or not it's intelligently done. I hope it is, and I think it will be, but I can't say for sure.

That said, how is it disrespectful? How is taking the pulse of the nation and reflecting it in art disrespectful? That's a pretty important thing to do, for art to take stock of events that have affected all of us. As I said before, it's far from being the first time a monster movie has done the same.
No one knows whether its intelligent or heavy handed, so lets not crucify one another just yet.
Yeah, we haven't seen the film. A movie like this can have the potential to say something intelligent about these issues. (I've heard that recent monster movie, from Korea I think, did just that.) Also, Drew Goddard.
jam2, might you be talking of the Korean monster movie The Host? That's an excellent flick.

And zeitgeist, egads...methinks you've fallen victim to the double/triple post daemon! (Well, until you fixed it.)
No one knows whether its intelligent or heavy handed, so lets not crucify one another just yet.

What about lynching ? ;-)

It might be intelligent or it might not but as UnpluggedCrazy says, these sorts of films reflect their time and have done for decades ("Them !", "Invasion of the Bodysnatchers", "The Day the Earth Stood Still" etc.). They're a way of externalising the threat, of controlling it.

Up until now though, that hasn't been allowed, we (but the US especially) haven't been allowed to own a part of our own cultural space, it's been controlled by what those idjets did in 2001. As I say, maybe it's too soon to start, essentially, putting September 11th in perspective, getting a handle on it by incorporating it into our fictions but it's a necessary step to take at some point IMO.

And of course, we can make both types of film crossoverman (and hopefully they'll be more film than message as opposed to e.g. "Lions for Lambs" which, IMO, was basically all message. Not seen 'Rendition' yet).

(and yeah, if you mean "The Host" jam2 then it had a fairly explicit subtext about the US and "collateral damage" - too explicit for me. Brilliant monster, not a brilliant monster movie IMO - many disagreed though)
Yeah guys, The Host is the one I was thinking of. Haven't seen it, but heard some good things about it.

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