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"Songs can hurt like a fist."
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March 21 2008

Subtle fandom at Harper's Magazine. Nice poem, title is a fun little shoutout.

Hey, my first thread!

[ edited by fleem on 2008-03-21 16:20 ]

My son once said that Buffy and Angel would eventually be the most popular shows in the world, because people like us will spread the word...be Buffyvangelists, in a word.

Glad to see that Harper's is doing their bit, however subtly.
The reference is so subtle that I don't get it. I'm actually not sure it is there at all.
Err, pretty thin I reckon ;). Nice bit of verse though.

('Heart' is spelled wrong for a start - with WR&H it's 'Hart', like the stag and signifier of the otherworld)
It says Wolfram's Divided Heart, which, if that's not really the title of the poem, is almost definitely a Wolfram & Hart nod. From the little info that I see on the page, it looks like the title was added by Harper's as the bit of verse they plucked out doesn't seem to have a name of its own aside from the name of the longer piece of which it is part. That sentence was way the %$#@ too long :)

Well, it wouldn't make sense as a standalone non-reference if they spelled it Hart, Saje. There's reference/nod and then there's shameless pandering :)
Do Harper's have a history of Buffy fandom then ?

Personally I think it's a nod to Stephen Wolfram, his stuff on cellular automata always makes me think of "I was Made to Love You".

;-)
No one got my Philip Larkin reference the other week. Maybe I should be less subtle. Mutter grumble.
The poet's name was Wolfram, and it's a poem about the heart. I don't really see an Angel connection here, but it's still cool anyways.
Yeah, but fandom is partially about seeing references where there are none and over-analyzing them whether they exist or not, right? Who is with me? ;)
I think it's a subtle Angel reference. People don't randomly stick "William's Divided Heart" on top of a Shakespeare sonnet. (The exception being "William's One-Time Tryst With Apprentice Poet Ben." ) Well plucked, fleem.
This strikes me as likely an accident, but IANA English major. Either way-- hey, good times.
Yeah, but fandom is partially about seeing references where there are none and over-analyzing them whether they exist or not, right? Who is with me? ;)

Hell yeah ! Now about that "season 8" comics comment of Joss' ...

;-)
Ah, just a coincidence--I contacted the fellow who posted the poem, and the headline. His response:

Regrettably, I don't know the program you reference. This is something I flagged back some 30 years ago when I was studying old German texts in Munich, and it reflects a thought at the core of the writing of the Minnesaenger, namely the reconciliation of human passions with reason as an ultimate aspiration--plus of course the new idea of romantic love.
So... it was Angel that accidentally obscurely referenced historical German literature, then.
Thought had crossed my mind, Sunfire.

Mr. Whedon? Mr. Greenwalt?

[ edited by Chris inVirginia on 2008-03-21 22:47 ]
... namely the reconciliation of human passions with reason as an ultimate aspiration ...

Angel: "It speaks to us, guides us. Passion rules us all, and we obey. What other choice do we have?"

Angel: "Passion is the source of our finest moments. The joy of love, the clarity of hatred, and the ecstasy of grief."

And therein lies the genius of Joss (or at least Ty King ;) and why, in my giddier moments, I almost entertain the "modern Shakespeare" claims. It was true to Wolfram von Eschenbach in the 13th century, to Billy Shakes in the 16th and 17th and it's still true now. It is, to borrow a phrase, "meaning of life stuff" ;).

Legitimate Whedon link be damned, I say the convergence is too true to be false and it should stay ;).

[ edited by Saje on 2008-03-21 23:33 ]
Amen to that, Saje.

And by "that" I mean your entire post.
Plus, "the writing of the Minnesaenger"

Could very well be fan wanked to 'the writing of the Messenger-Minear'.
I think it's a subtle Angel reference. People don't randomly stick "William's Divided Heart" on top of a Shakespeare sonnet. (The exception being "William's One-Time Tryst With Apprentice Poet Ben." ) Well plucked, fleem.
Pointy | March 21, 20:15 CET


Pointy gets my vote for wittiest comment on the thread. ;-)

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