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Whedonesque - a community weblog about Joss Whedon
"You don't have a woman's touch, whatever your taste in clothing may indicate."
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August 11 2003

The (Un)Bearable Darkness of Buffy. PopPolitics.com digs into S6.

"I need to make an admission here: I take Buffy the Vampire Slayer very seriously; there are times when it seems like the one thing pure and good in the cold dark world of network television."

True, that. I've been watching Alias to pass the Summer. It's mildly entertaining. You can see it's got a lot of money behind it. Expensive gueststars. An attempt at other worldliness with that silly 'prophecy' storyline. The acting by the two main leads is mediocre (thank god for Victor Garber). I feel like I'm eating Kentucky Fried when I was having sushi before.

Gimme back my Buffyverse.

Hasn't this link already been posted? (After searching the archives, I can verify my hunch: Whedonesque May 22nd, 2003.) Anyway, this article is great and deserves repeated mentioning. Especially the interpretation of the "Trio" was an eye-opener for me:

If Buffy grew into adulthood by painfully learning that she couldn’t treat people as things, the Trio’s villainy emerged specifically through their tendency to do just that. They fancied themselves as supervillains out of comic books: conjuring spells, building gadgets, and causing mayhem to scoring cash and women, and despite their adolescent nerd-charm, their childish selfishness turned them into thieves, murderers, and rapists.

Where previous seasons offered supernatural Big Bads with metaphorical resonance, all of the villainy in Season Six was born out of genuine human weakness, insecurity, and selfishness.

Not that one should go through the archive and repeat every single post in Whedonesque that's happened since day one, but I think the occasional repeat can be forgiven. Especially if it was over two months ago.

Season six was simultaneously the most real and the most unreal of the series. When pressed, it's my favorite. It's the season that won me over. Although The Gift was a culmination of the past five years, season six was a declaration that after both defeat and triumph, life goes on. I think in the fall of 2001 we needed that message more than anything.
Sorry - didn't check at all. Blush.

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