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April 01 2009

Dollhouse gets UK airdate. The first episode will air on Sci Fi UK on Tuesday, May 19th at 9pm.

It'll then be repeated at 10pm on the Thursday.

Hmm. Wouldn't it affect ratings if UK folks found out the show had been canceled just the day before? Oh well, I guess there's nothing to be done, really.
Or it could improve ratings if they found out that the show has been renewed the day before. And the glass is half-full ;).
On yet another hand, it's just after the season finale in the US. There might be some "Omg! Watch this show 'cause the ending is so awesome!"-hype.
This better mean it's going to be on iTunes UK.
Pure speculation but I'd guess that Sci Fi pay less if the show has finished running in the US (not meaning cancelled but I'd guess we'd know by then), hense showing it the week after.

Still no indication as to whether they'll be editing anything out because the episodes are longer. Hope not.

Still, I'm looking forward to showing it to my Whedon-loving friends! Less than 7 weeks!
I think this show is more accessible for people in the UK since there's less references to American pop culture then say, in BtVS and Angel, and there's Adelle "You have to admit I'm very...British " deWitt. (Although BtVS had Giles and Angel had Wesley)
Don't believe it will be going on iTunes. They've not paid much for it.
I wondering how Sci Fi UK will deal with the "remote-free" aspect of the show. Will they cut the episodes to make sure their usual amount of ads air or not?
Or stuff it with ads during the breaks and make it an hour and a half show ! That'd be excruciating (for live viewers), but I wouldn't put it past any network.
Fringe has a 70 minute slot on sky one, so I'm guessing SciFi will do something similar for Dollhouse.
According to the listings, they're not.
Hmm. It is a puzzler.
I think we may have a 'Spooks' situation in reverse. 'Spooks' ('MI5' in the US) is apparently cut for time to fit into a US TV hour with the standard numbers of adverts (which means losing about 10-15 minutes of each and every episode). Seems like 'Dollhouse' might get cut the same way which would be pretty bad (yet another reason it would've been better if the BBC had got it).

I think this show is more accessible for people in the UK since there's less references to American pop culture then say, in BtVS and Angel, and there's Adelle "You have to admit I'm very...British " deWitt. (Although BtVS had Giles and Angel had Wesley)

We're awash in US pop culture over here, in 12 seasons of Buffy and Angel I could count on two hands the number of references I didn't actually know (usually sports stars, occasionally Bob Barker ;) and on a couple of fingers the number that weren't understandable from context.

Anyway, 'Dollhouse' won't be anywhere near as successful as Buffy (or probably 'Angel') for the simple reason that it's on a much smaller channel. If it got the best ratings Sci-Fi UK ever had it'd still be about an eighth of what Buffy had on BBC2.
Heh, Dollhouse will air in the UK on the fifth anniversary of Angel's finale.
We're awash in US pop culture over here, in 12 seasons of Buffy and Angel I could count on two hands the number of references I didn't actually know (usually sports stars, occasionally Bob Barker ;) and on a couple of fingers the number that weren't understandable from context.

I meant, accessible for people who don't like to be awash with American pop culture. For example, not everyone appreciates the number of American pop culture references Buffy had.
They will likely cut approx 8 minutes per episode out. Unless they're kind.
Probably, though it baffles me how they can and keep it coherent. 'MI5' apparently doesn't do that well in the US and if they're cutting 15 minutes from every episode you can see why (OK, not see why). 8 minutes is a smaller proportion of the episode but not by much.

I meant, accessible for people who don't like to be awash with American pop culture. For example, not everyone appreciates the number of American pop culture references Buffy had.

Do you mean people in the UK J.I.G. ? Cos that's not a complaint i've really heard about Buffy here (where, despite having 1/5 the population, BtVS had a comparable number of viewers to the US). Most people seem to just accept that if you're watching an American TV show (like Buffy or 'Dollhouse') then you also have to accept that it might well have references to American culture in it which you'll either get or not get.

UK shows talk about 'spanners' and 'hob nobs' and 'Eastenders' and 'boots' and 'bonnets' (of cars). That's fine, just as Buffy's references are (whether people enjoy being "the 51st state" as some put it is a bigger, slightly different question).
I've heard and read it before about Buffy. It's apparently "too American" and for the life of me I cannot understand that concept.

Oh, and Dollhouse is airing later than I thought it would. I was expecting mid-to-late April.
8 minutes??? How can you enjoy Dollhouse with 8 minutes cut?
Maybe I should wait until tomorrow to tell any Ukers.
Cause it is April 1st here still. When is it April 2nd in the UK when it is here?
"I've heard and read it before about Buffy. It's apparently "too American" and for the life of me I cannot understand that concept. "

Thats just bizarre! All good TV IS American. Speaking as a UK viewer I think that is utterly ridiculous....mind you there are alot of thick people over here!
On the "Buffy is too American" debate, I'll put my hand up and say I did struggle with the show at one stage, in part because my school existence in the UK just didn't map to US high school life. Of course, I managed to get over that and enjoy the show for what it's worth but it was a barrier.
What constitutes a barrier is different for everyone of course and I guess it depends on what TV shows, movies, books etc. you've been exposed to.

For myself, despite never even having set foot in America, we get so many US shows over here ('Wonder Years', 'My So Called Life' etc. and before that stuff like 'Degrassi Jnr High' - even though that's Canadian - and 'The Breakfast Club') that i've been aware of how high-school works in the US for almost as long as i've known how it works in England (which is slightly different again to how it works in Scotland).

Interesting to hear it though, not something i'd come across before.


ETA: Or rather, i've been aware of how high-school is depicted as working in America for that long. What the reality is I have no idea.

[ edited by Saje on 2009-04-02 17:08 ]

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