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"Can't even shout, can't even cry, the gentlemen are coming by."
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December 04 2009

Alexis Denisof analyses Dollhouse. "It would be nice if morality were black and white, and sexuality were black and white, and right and wrong were clear as day and night, but they're simply not".

I love him. That's a nice little interview, thanks so much!
Awesome interview. So rare that we get to hear from Alexis. He's so eloquent.
This is a really great interview.
Yep, good interview. From a selfish point of view it's a shame Alexis doesn't do more of them but if he's a fella that prefers his privacy then I can dig it.
Jevon Phillips and Alexis seemed to have that good rapport that makes for good interviews, and Alexis really does nail some stuff beautifully. This was quite the chunky lil' interview.

I espcially liked these two bits - the first, about Joss:

"He's willing to be complex when Hollywood wants it simple. Willing to be dark when Hollywood wants it light. He's a brave storyteller and a brave writer and I admire him tremendously."

and then this bit, about life and the Dollhouse:

"In the struggle, there's beauty in art music and poetry and engineering that mankind has come up with to cope with these things. The show and the dollhouse may just strip bare some of the darker themes that exist in the world, and he's writing to a different audience than 'Buffy.' His audience is maturing and Joss is wise to allow his writing to."

I think that's the ticket, I do indeed.


ETF: I'd lost me quotey-marks, I 'ad.

[ edited by QuoterGal on 2009-12-04 11:16 ]
If ever I had a crush on another man....
. . . to [take] the dollhouse out of its isolated form and have it tie in a little bit more deeply and darkly into the political structure of this country. And then start to play with ideas about corruption and the manipulation of politics in our system of government ... The inherent corruption of man can often bring down the best system.

Now I need all nine remaining episodes right away. Even the one that hasn't been shot.
Yeah Pointy, I liked all of it but

"The inherent corruption of man can often bring down the best system. We're no better than who we are. We make a great system worse than it is. The American story is a story of great moments and dreadful moments."

was probably my favourite single bit. Cos, y'know, true dat (i'd broaden it out to include everyone but it's arguably truer of America, not because Yanks are any more corrupt than the rest of us - you're not #1 at everything ;) - but because the USA is one of the two big "designed" systems of government in recent times. The UK and most other places just kind of happened over time but America and the USSR were deliberately "built" to be better answers to the question "How do we live as social beings ?").
I agree with Alexis on the grayness of morality. However, I'll point out there are still deep darks and brilliant lights within that spectrum, extremes which we as a society overwhelmingly condem or applaud.

I think the reason our society is in such a pickle now is we've shirked personal responsibility far too long. Take our economy. It's in meltdown, and there's plenty of blame to spread around. Yet nobody is being held accountable. We've had the greatest wealth transfer in human history, but we sit on our hands and do nothing to stop or reverse it. What's up with that?!?
Because we're pretty much all to blame quantumac. We created the system we used to fuck ourselves over with.

Which is pretty much what Dollhouse is about, as it happens.
I didn't create any system. Many of those young enough to have not really had much of an effect on shaping the economy, policies, and the like are just waking up to how this all works. Sure, we've existed and even thrived within this system, enjoyed the benefits of it along with suffering its flaws, but...this was all set in motion long before I was born and simply continued/allowed to happen by my grandparents, parents, and assorted other family members and fellow developed world inhabitants. Some of them affected positive change, but it looks like the bad decisions/greed outweighed the good.

Many of us are not to blame, but we do have a responsibility for what happens next. I have no clue how to get us out of the clusterfuck, but starting on a personal level isn't a bad idea. I worked at paying off my debt since the summer, will be debt-free by the end of January, don't wanna use it anymore (credit card gets tucked away like it used to be before I started abusing it a bit in the past couple years). Debt seems to be one of the biggest problems. Using money that's not ours/that we don't have/that's difficult to pay off (if you get in deep enough). It's as much a social issue as pick-any-prejudice/narrowmindedness.

[ edited by Kris on 2009-12-06 08:21 ]
I, too, am paying off all of my debts. And it's hard, since if I were rolling in the dough, I would have been able to pay them off years ago. :-/

So, if the Dollhouse was to represent (one facet) our economy in the good 'ol US of A, who would we be? Dolls, clients, or handlers?
One of the best things I've ever read pertaining to Dollhouse; simple, straightforward, and of course now, with the Perrin character being introduced, and what Alexis says, it's apparent what Joss would have been aiming for had the show not been cancelled.

AND I'M PISSED OFF ALL OVER AGAIN. What is more morally gray than politics? What an opportunity yanked away.

It's hard to imagine Alexis being tortured but if he shares it with Joss, hopefully they'll keep pulling through.

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