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Whedonesque - a community weblog about Joss Whedon
"You give it up for the Yorkie?"
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April 21 2010

Samuel L. Jackson talks more about The Avengers and Joss Whedon. He seems to believe Joss is actually signed on.

Trying to remind myself it's all rumors until there is the purple word.
Yeah, sounds like just something he heard, probably from the same internet rumor.

When it is official and papers are signed, I can't imagine they wouldn't announce it right away. Right? That's generally how it works, unless there's some reason for secrecy.
Marvel tends to offically announce these things a few weeks after it's already out there on the net.For example,Chris Evans as Captain America was made offical about two or three weeks after it leaked online as being a done deal.

[ edited by Buffyfantic on 2010-04-21 19:40 ]
I don't think they dare to not sign him at this point... The backlash would be huge...
It's not like they're likely to find anyone more suited for the job.
Yea. Joss's resume to apply for this job (which I'm sure is how it's done :P) is pretty much perfect. He's written and headed up many different types of comic books at this point, some of which are bestsellers, he's got a 7 year hit TV series about a superhero under his belt, and he prefers to write ensemble casts. He's pretty much the perfect fit for this thing.
Can we get a copy of the Whedoneque rules dealing with who is a part of the Whedonverse? I need to know who I'm suppose to link articles about after Joss finishes The Avengers movie. And then Avengers 2 and 3 and so on because there will be sequels.

How about Stan Lee? He always has a cameo in the Marvel movies so you know he will be in it. Will that make him part of the Whedonverse, 'cause that would just be cool.
@Djungelurban: I'm guessing that issues of creative control are taking awhile to negotiate. No one wants a repeat of the Wonder Woman fiasco. It seems unlikely to me that money would be the sticking point.
Can we get a copy of the Whedonesque rules dealing with who is a part of the Whedonverse?


There aren't so much written rules dealing with this, as a body of oral tradition set down in these pages. A Whedon mishnah, if you like. ;-).

I think it's a little early to be worrying about. I will say, speaking for myself only, that we shouldn't go crazy linking to every little project of every person involved in the flick, particularly those who are already established names. Bear in mind that this is a Whedoncentric blog, and that "cast & crew" projects should generally play a backseat role.
janef: No one wants a repeat of the Wonder Woman fiasco.

It sounded like the WW execs wanted the story equivalent of "porn": they couldn't describe what it was, but claimed they would recognize it when they saw it.

If Marvel doesn't like the current script, or Joss's rewrite, at least they'll be able to be specific about where they want to go. The Avengers will have at least a few ground rules:
1) Minimum of: Nick Fury, Iron Man, Cap, Thor (and probably Hulk)
2) In-team squabling (if not outright fistacuffs)
3) At least one scene of massive mahem. Any villain that Thor needs help with, will cause a lot of CGI destruction.
4) Stan Lee cameo

I'm wondering if the appearance of Fury & S.H.I.E.L.D in AXM helped influence the execs. Gave them a sample of what Joss could do with Samuel Jackson. "Yeah what I got is the urge to disappear and leave this dink at the the mercy of these very unreasonable super-powered types."

While there are some preferred bad guys (Kang, Ultron) for comic book fans, there isn't anyone so iconic enough to limit whatever Joss has in mind. I've already stated my preference for something like Count Nefaria (Avengers 164-166), as a self-contained story.
OneTeV, I'm fairly certain the plot for the first movie is, Fury puts the Avengers together specifically to go after the Hulk. It's simple and effective, with the bonus that the villain role doesn't need to be "explained". Moviegoers get who the Hulk is and why he's a threat. Kang, Ultron, Nefaria--lots of backstory required, and in a movie that already has, at minimum, three Avengers + Fury (and of course we'll be seeing more team members too) we really don't need any more exposition gumming up the works.

As for Wonder Woman, the problem was the character, not Joss. There simply isn't anything worthwhile there. She's a superpowered woman in a bathing suit with a lasso and magic bracelets and an invisible plane. She has no worthwhile enemies to speak of, an origin story that doesn't resonate, and no central conflict: why is she doing this? Who knows? Spider-Man does what he does out of guilt, Batman out of a need for vengeance, Iron man to make up for past sins, Cap for patriotism during a just war. Wonder Woman has great name recognition but no motivation. The only things people actually know about her and associate with her are the goofy things that actually make her more difficult to sell: the cheesecake outfit, the rope. A Wonder Woman movie would have to essentially build her character from the ground up and jettison half a century of goofy crap. It could be that one of the luckiest things that ever happened to Joss Whedon was Warners passing on his Wonder Woman script, because I'm not sure the character is salvageable. Let someone else try to polish that brick.
Hellmouthguy: Nefaria--lots of backstory required

The particular story arc I mentioned could bypass this. Rich guy loses money due to criminal acts, does experimental procedures to gain super powers (at the expense of others). Gets obsessed with his own im-mortality. That's all the backstory needed.

I guess I'm reluctant about heroes versus Hulk because it has been done so many times before (in comics and animation).

A Wonder Woman movie would have to essentially build her character from the ground up and jettison half a century of goofy crap.

That's what I figured would have to happen. Wonder Woman was created (by the gods?), unlike the other Amazons, so she *should* be an outsider to that society, despite her attempts to fit in. Might also make for an interesting contrast if the villain used cloning or eugenics to breed super people.

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