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"Oh, BALLS."
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August 28 2012

Btchflcks.com blog has Buffy week. Bitch Flicks, a web site devoted to showcasing movies, television, and media about women, is having a Buffy themed week.

Perhaps it's my age and feeling cranky this morning, but I can't say I'm a fan of the name of the blog. They celebrate women by calling us bitches? To me, it's like a website devoted to showcasing work by blacks being called N-word-flicks.com
Amrita - I had the same reaction, so it's not just you. I had absolutely no desire to click on the link as a result (and have not).
I think the emphasis is on women who kick ass, not a celebration of women in general.
The original article was published by Femthreads here: http://femthreads.com/2011/02/10/buffy-kicks-ass/
It's not just one article. So far there are five, and I think it's going to continue for the rest of the week.

Are You Ready to Be Strong? Power and Sisterhood in 'Buffy'
Buffy Kicks Ass
The View from the Grave: Buffy as Gothic Feminist
The Incoherent Metaphysics of the Buffyverse
How the Vampire Slayer Turned This Girl into a Feminist

[ edited by takeagabu on 2012-08-28 18:24 ]
The sisterhood article is provocative.
Isn't the bitch thing like language reclamation? A lot of women my age (mid 20's) seem to enjoy reclaiming words like bitch, c**t, and other terms used by the patriarchy to denigrate women.

I love articles like this, thanks for posting.
"Isn't the bitch thing like language reclamation? A lot of women my age (mid 20's) seem to enjoy reclaiming words like bitch, c**t, and other terms used by the patriarchy to denigrate women."


Perhaps that's what's happening, but I fail to see how embracing derogatory speech elevates anyone.

There's an old truism that in a culture during its ascension, the lower classes try to emulate the upper classes, e.g. poor people place high value on education, proper speech and dress. In a culture's descent, wealthy, educated people dress, speak and act like the poor, uneducated, criminal elements of society. We see this happening now.

The remedy for derogatory labels isn't for women to embrace those words to describe themselves, or to become crude and coarse like the men who disrespect them, but to have self-respect, insist that people speak to them with respect and courtesy. This poor, battered society needs more civility, not less.

I apologize for veering O/T.
"There's an old truism that in a culture during its ascension, the lower classes try to emulate the upper classes, e.g. poor people place high value on education, proper speech and dress. In a culture's descent, wealthy, educated people dress, speak and act like the poor, uneducated, criminal elements of society. We see this happening now."

To me, that's way more offensive than any "derogatory" words. Words can change meaning, they can lose their power and symbolism. Speaking about classes and such... That's just... Ew.
There's an old truism

I'd be interested to see any examples of that "truism" older than the culture wars of the 1960s.
Re: the word "class": There was an "e.g." there to show how I meant the term to be taken.

One example would be the immigrants and pioneers in the U.S. who lived in grinding poverty, yet valued education for their children and tried hard to look their best, even if their clothes were old and patched. The old chestnut of walking five miles to school through the snow was no lie. They wanted to work their way out of poverty. You still see this attitude today in a lot of developing countries.

Among the ruling elite of ancient Rome in the years leading up to the sack of Rome, it became fashionable to dress like the Germanic people they had conquered.

Look, I've been homeless and had less than a dollar to my name. For eight years I cleaned houses and scrubbed toilets for wealthy people (some had kind hearts, some were snobs). I live in a trailer park. But I've never at any time considered myself a poor person. Billionaire or bagger at the grocery store, I treat everybody with the same courtesy and respect. Class snob I am not.
Among the ruling elite of ancient Rome in the years leading up to the sack of Rome, it became fashionable to dress like the Germanic people they had conquered.

A) which sack of Rome? Rome was sacked multiple times. Many of these instances were not particularly significant as markers of Rome's "decline."

B) cite for this? I'm deep in the middle of Gibbon's Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire right now and have seen no mention of this sartorial switch, nor can I recall reading of this before.

C) Imitating an enemy people isn't actually what you described above. The Germanic tribes were not the "lower classes" of Rome (although, no doubt, some individual Germanic tribesmen were members of the Roman lower classes, if the Roman upper class had been imitating Germanic fashions it would be an imitation of the distant "Barbarian" not of the local "lower class" people.

D) I asked for an example of the "truism"--i.e., of someone actually making the claim that this was a common pattern. It may be that you can actually find an instance of a society where the upper classes took to imitating some aspect of the lower class manners shortly before a widely recognized "decline" but what I wanted was some evidence that this has been held by anyone to be a "typical" pattern prior to the culture wars of the 1960s.

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