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November 26 2012

Grace Randolph's reservations about SHIELD tv show. BleedingCool/Stacktastic's Grace Randolph's older but still relevant video expresses some concern about how the SHIELD TV show will play in the broader MCU scheme.

While the linked clip is from August (so it doesn't address any of the casting news since - she shares her enthusiastic response to that in her NYCC wrapup video) she makes some interesting points about the risks Marvel takes in attempting to transfer their big-screen magic to the small screen (and with any luck, back again). Randolph speaks knowledgeably of Joss' strengths and the Whedon troupe.

Hers strikes me as a minority but thought-provoking perspective. Also, her show is directed primarily at comic book readers but I find she brings in that stream of discussion rather enticingly and non-threateningly.

Wow - I just spent the past hour failing to come up with something other than an outright diatribe to this woman's... analysis of things, but in the end I remembered something the great George Carlin once said, namely, "Never argue with an idiot. They will only bring you down to their level and beat you with experience." So maybe I'll just leave it at that. For now.

[ edited by brinderwalt on 2012-11-26 23:06 ]
Surely you can express disagreement without calling the author an idiot.
Don't call me Shirley.
"Cobie Smulders was the weakest link in the Avengers."

What? Is there a signifigant number of people who say this? She had a small role, but I wouldn't consider it "weak" at all. If anyone, most people seem to say Hawkeye had the weakest role.
Also, is she honestly suggesting that a Marvel TV show would cause LESS people to go see Marvel movies?
Wow, maybe I misestimated in thinking Whedonesquers would find what she said interesting.

To me, what Randolph was suggesting was that the TV show would need to be fairly well-considered in order to not compete directly with (and in doing so, usurp) what people go to see the Marvel movies for.

I think she makes a good point considering the success of the movies is dependent on being able to satisfy BOTH the die-hard fans and general movie audiences; and that replicating the success in a TV format would mean offering something to die-hard fans and general television audiences, for whom the value proposition is different.

While most if not all of us are confident in (Joss) Whedon, (Jed) Whedon and (Maurissa Tancharoen) Whedon putting that kind of thinking into the series, I'm not really sure what's so scandalous about her pointing out that they don't want to shoot their (i.e. Marvel's) own grand future plans in the foot.

Also, not knowing all that much about the collaboration that goes on in the production of comic books, her comment on Kevin Feige was interesting to me.

shrug floating, boats, etc.

[ edited by counti8 on 2012-11-27 01:18 ]
Surely you can express disagreement without calling the author an idiot.

If it was just a question of simple disagreement, then of course. But unfortunately it goess much farther than that since most of her points don't make any kind of logical sense if you think about them.

Plus, speaking as someone with multiple close relatives actively working in the field as well as being a stage actor myself, I found her whole tv vs. film acting classicism spiel to be idiotically offensive (although I will say that there doesn't seem to be any malice or ill will at heart - so there is that.)
All the more reason to express yourself respectfully.
But ermm... who would ignore the existence of the films with their high budget, stars and spectacle in favour of a weekly tv series with tv actors and tv budgets? I'm not dissing either one but it's a completely false dichotomy. The TV series will appeal to some, the films will appeal to some and there's going to be a lot of crossover.

While I agree that Cobie Smulders was miscast, drawing a link between that and Joss's actor pool screwing up the films or the show is nonsense. It assumes that television acting is inferior to film acting which definitely isn't true.
I too thought her comment about a tv audience drawing eyes away from motion pictures was some really backward (lack of) logic.

I don't know if the tv show will succeed, but if it does I don't see how it can do anything other than increase interest in motin pictures. Just look at how many people go to see a movie specifically because it used to be a tv show that they watched. Television tie-ins and nostalgia will increase the number of moviegoers not decrease them.

Also, the comment about Nathan doing well on tv being the reason he can't get a job in Marvel movies (if that is even true?)... Does that make any sense to anybody at all?

[ edited by lottalettuce on 2012-11-27 04:08 ]

[ edited by lottalettuce on 2012-11-27 04:09 ]
I'd like to know why she's so confident "Dark Knight Rises" introduced us to Nightwing. Given his name is Robin and not Dick. I'd also like to know why a Nightwing being introduced by Nolan precludes a Justice League movie or means we're going to have a Nightwing movie. I also don't know why we "need" a Justice League movie.

Who says Nathan's being on TV is keeping him from getting parts in Marvel U, DCU, or any other U movies?

So let me get this straight--her fear is a SHIELD TV show will make people go "I know I loved the Avengers but since I don't like this show that has none of the Avengers or Nick Fury on it, I'm not gonna see the sequel."

Let's just say Cobie Smulders was a weak link. That means TV actors performing on a TV show will make people go "This SHIELD show has only TV actors so I'm not gonna see the Avengers sequel because even though they were all movie actors except this one chick and even though I already know I loved the first one I'm not gonna risk seeing the sequel because it may be invaded by TV actors who we all know are inherently weak links."

Or is she afraid people will say "I'm so comfortable watching this SHIELD show at my house, that pretty much fills up my SHIELD quotient. I'm not gonna get off my butt and see a sequel to the movie I thought was awesome."

Am I missing something?
Considering the company she was keeping in that movie, to say Smulders was the weakest link is a bit of a compliment, really. RDJ, Hiddleston, Evans, Johansen, Gregg, Samuel L., Ruffalo -- I'd cheerfuly be the worst actor in that lineup if I got to be in the lineup.

But I agree that she made several leaps of logic. By the same token, we do try to play the ball around here, not the woman. And when her ball is so easily, easily played, why would we even bother playing her?
@brinderwalt - "I know people who work in the business and I myself am a stage actor. Therefore, her comments hit a little too close to home and I found her television versus film actor classicism especially offensive. Most of all, I feel that they make little to no sense. I doubt she meant any real harm and it probably just comes from a place of being misinformed (or uninformed altogether). However, her analysis does not present strong credibility to me."

There. Is that better? I think I fixed it. No hostile name-calling to be found. :)
kungfubear you literally took the words out of my mouth. :)

Let's just say Cobie Smulders was a weak link. That means TV actors performing on a TV show will make people go "This SHIELD show has only TV actors so I'm not gonna see the Avengers sequel because even though they were all movie actors except this one chick and even though I already know I loved the first one I'm not gonna risk seeing the sequel because it may be invaded by TV actors who we all know are inherently weak links."


Which makes even less sense if you happen to know that Robert Downey Jr, Chris Hemsworth, and Clark Gregg have all had extensive careers acting for television (and in fact - at least by my reckoning - the only major cast member without at least a recurring tv credit to their name at the time was Scarlett Johansson.)
Jack Nicholson was on The Andy Griffith Show. :)

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