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March 09 2013

Ain't It Cool reviews Much Ado About Nothing. "The reason Whedon has such a huge fan following is that he never forgets that it begins with interesting characters. The characters of MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING are complicated creatures, and Whedon and the actors breathe life into them in a facile way."

A lovely review! I can't wait to see this movie ohmygoodness.
A really nice review. I can't wait to see MAAN my own self!
A lovely review, but it had me worried for a moment - possibly a transatlantic thing. "A facile way" implies "trivialising" and "glib" to me - something I very much doubt is true.
Probably Nordling misusing the word, I wouldn't be too worried about it.
Had the same response to "facile," and I'm on the U.S. side of the Atlantic. Nevertheless, the bulk of the review is nice.
"Facile" got me too (U.S.), to the point where I came here to read the comments before checking the article. What you all say has made my dread evaporate. Xei-xei.

Oh, heh. Picky, picky, picky. Whedon's "staple of actors" is mentioned twice toward the end of the piece. We may be present willy-nilly at the birth of a new collective noun, while "facile" gets a new shade of meaning.

But it's a favorable review, which is the point.

[ edited by FloralBonnet on 2013-03-10 01:05 ]
It did seem like a slightly odd use of facile, but my trusty dictionary informs me that it's a legitimate (albeit somewhat obscure) synonym for easy/effortless.

But I'm from Australia, so what would I know about language? :)
It is sweet that everyone here is supposing that the writer is using 'facile' properly when he similarly misused 'staple of actors' when he clearly meant 'stable of actors' (that is the cliche).
The words threw me a little too. That the Whedon repertory of actors are a staple of our viewing enjoyment, there is no doubt, but thinking of them as thoroughbreds housed in the Stable of Whedon, is also pleasurable.

[ edited by Tonya J on 2013-03-10 01:50 ]
@embers - yeah, "staple" was pretty clearly an error. I'd still maintain that "facile" was used at least somewhat legitimately.

It's in the dictionary that way and everything.
Oh yeah, facile is a word, and not a terrible word, but it is usually used in the negative (implying superficial, lame, limp) I just assumed he was meaning to say with facility (adept, deft, skillful). Just sayin.
embers, he was meaning to say with facility. That is one meaning of facile. (It's not a coincidence that the word facil in Spanish means easy.) Regardless of whether the people in this thread are familiar with that use of the word, the writer used it properly.

[ edited by Let Down on 2013-03-10 02:03 ]
Oh I cannot resist: Let Down? That is a facile argument (I can say that because you might think it is a compliment!).
Edit - never mind. I'm already over quota on "arguments with strangers about things that aren't important"

Looking forward to Much Ado. Hurrah :)

[ edited by vocalnick on 2013-03-10 04:09 ]
Interesting, I hadn't notice the use of the word "facile" until I read the comments. I guess my brain just sorta skipped it (facile means easy/easily in italian, so I didn't notice anything wrong with it!).

Anyway... I'm really looking forward to this film! Not sure it will ever come out in theaters in Italy, but here's hoping :)
I met Joss and he gave me an advance dvd copy of Much Ado! Then I woke up. :-(

Cannot wait to see this film. Great review from Nordling.
A staple of actors is what holds the cast together.
redeem147, Ha! Yeah, Ain't It Cool doesn't have the greatest writers in the world. And obviously no one to proofread their stuff. But glad he liked it, and that's what really matters.

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