This site will work and look better in a browser that supports web standards, but it is accessible to any browser or Internet device.

Whedonesque - a community weblog about Joss Whedon
"Mist. Cemetery. Halloween. This should end well."
11944 members | you are not logged in | 29 July 2014












September 03 2013

Joss Whedon on filmmaking: starting out and story. Recorded back in June, this is part one of BAFTA Guru's video interview with Joss. It can also be viewed on YouTube.

Yay, slight British accent Joss! Also, I could swear he was on the verge of quoting "Live as though the world were as it should be, to show it what it can be" right at the end there. Looking forward to the other parts.
What the? Meet Joss Whedon, the new poster boy for Speech Accommodation Theory
Huh. Now he just needs to perfect his Yorkshire accent and we're set. He says some very wise wisdom-y things here. Puts creating "messages" in stories in very simple and effective terms. Cool.
I've added a link to the video on YouTube for those who can't view it on the webpage.
That's a hell of a half-accent right there. Quite disconcerting after being used to his normal speech.

I really liked the point he made about Buffy. I think the only time any male character had a problem with Buffy being stronger was Xander, but that was limited to a few examples very early in the show.
Riley had huge issues about Buffy being stronger, especially after his Initiative world started to fall apart. Also Forrest was particularly unable to deal with Buffy. Graham never seemed bothered by it all, though.

Lots of other examples come to mind. The Watchers Council, all about keeping strong women under their collective thumb. Ted. Warren. The Mayor.
Wow, that was so simple--surround Buffy with men who are glad she has power, stick them in a world that isn't--and yet I never got it until he said it. The man dispenses structure tips like narrative Pez.
I've heard him talk before about how the men around her thought her being powerful (and often in charge) was perfectly natural. It's a wonderful point. I hadn't heard him couch it in terms of the contrast before, that even though the core group (regular characters) consider her strength normal, the rest of the world doesn't. I like that a lot.
Other than Buffy beating up Larry in the Season 2 Halloween episode (and Xander complaining about feeling emasculated), I really can't think of a time Buffy being more powerful physically was ever an issue for him. Honestly, it seems like Buffy throwing it in Xander's face seemed like the more common occurrence over the 7 seasons.
Really interesting.

[ edited by Numfar PTB on 2013-09-04 13:12 ]
Also, does Joss seem more serious when he's British?
MissKittysMom, I was always under the impression that Riley's problem was less that Buffy was stronger and more that she was distant from him. It was Buffy that believed it was because she was stronger. Your other examples are well made, though I do think those people (Warren, The Watchers, etc.) are meant to be considered "outside."
Giles, watch Riley as he crumbles, from late season 4 into season 5. Particularly after he's weaned from the Initiative's chips and drugs, he thinks Buffy won't care about him if he isn't super-strong. He wants Buffy to be dependent on him emotionally as well. He falls back completely into a 1960s corn-fed Iowa-boy archetype who is out of his depth in every possible way. His breakup with Buffy in Into the Woods just reeks (does not rhyme with meek) with control issues.
A lot of their S5 interaction was them sort of connecting, and Buffy immediately pushing him away when she's on the brink of being emotionally open and vulnerable. Serious discussions of the relationship abruptly interrupted by a request to pick up Dawn after school.

Riley was looking for reassurance from any quarter, and the show kept providing missed opportunities.

You need to log in to be able to post comments.
About membership.



joss speaks back home back home back home back home back home