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Whedonesque - a community weblog about Joss Whedon
"Phil? His first name is Agent."
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July 22 2014

German review of Much Ado About Nothing. The film is on limited release in German cinemas from Thursday. High praise for Amy Acker in a positive review in German newspaper Die Welt. Another review can be found on the Faz website.

German website for the film includes a list of cinemas & the usual press info.

Tomorrow morning I'm standing at the newsdealer's, buying Die Welt. Thanks for the hint! In former years basically Dietmar Dath of the FAZ took notice of Joss' work with his well-informed and lauding reviews.
Its very, very positive, glowing, i would say, and while it defines Amy Acker as something special, it also admits to be astounded at how good people only known for comic adaptations and vampire killing are with Shakespeare.
A quick/rough translation of the first three paragraphs:

That Shakespeare's comedy is 'about nothing' is nonsense, and the piece is also no comedy. Making that clear is the accomplishment of Joss Whedon's new movie, which however is not all that new; filmed in 2012, it is only now arriving in German theaters to fill the void left by the world soccer championship.

Forget the stockings-and-daggers version that Kenneth Branagh put forth in 1993; it dealt (as the critic Roger Ebert recognized) in 'sunshine and laughter and fields of flowers' and 'healthy young people' whose good mood was not to be spoiled by the dark undercurrents in Shakespeare's action.

Whedon, who like Branagh demanded the original text from his actors, offers a black-and-white film in which the laughter dies in one's throat, and viewers will need to wipe the tears from their eyes following the 'Happy End.' That is how Shakespeare, and film, should be.
I was mildly curious how the translation is handled.
Subbed or dubbed? Modern German, or do they tweak the language to reflect the Shakespearean influence?
Talk about a glowing review! (and accurate one.)
Wow, I never thought it would make it to German cinemas after such a long time... Maybe there's still hope for my little Austria as well ;)
Anyway, great review!
@OneTeV I just saw the German version (and I am actually still in the movies to watch the original again) and what I can say with definitiveness is that it's dubbed. And it's also definitely Shakespeare speech if that's what you are asking. :) I guess they took it from the translation of the play for the most part but I wouldn't know. :P

It only took me 8 or so watches to spot David Fury at the party.

[ edited by Huschel on 2014-07-24 20:48 ]

[ edited by Huschel on 2014-07-24 22:57 ]

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