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March 06 2006

Who Got Snubbed? A Shout-outathon. Forget Serenity (if humanly possible). I want everyone to weigh in with one person -- in any category -- they think did statue-grabbin' work this year that nobody (in the academy) noticed. Be heard!

Miranda July in Me and You and Everyone We Know
Maria Bello in A History of Violence
Nolan - Batman Begins. Crafting a film like that is very hard. And it turned out really interesting. And profitable.

[ edited by gossi on 2006-03-06 03:19 ]
I would have been inclined to give Rachel McAdams a nomination - either as Best Actress for 'Red Eye' or Best Supporting Actress for 'The Wedding Crashers'. I'm making no particular comment about either film, just her performance in them. She's someone to look out for in the future, I think.

[ edited by dashboardprophet on 2006-03-06 02:53 ]
Two movies that I think should have been nominated for Best Picture, but weren't, were "Cinderella Man" and "The Constant Gardener." Ralph Fiennes and Russell Crowe (despite the tabloid stuff) should have gotten nominations for best performance by an actor.
I don't know, I spent all of my money seeing Serenity repeatedly. I couldn't afford to see other movies.
I don't know, I spent all of my money seeing Serenity repeatedly. I couldn't afford to see other movies.

Hey, can we nominate posters? I declare you winner of 100 penny sweets. The cola bottles are the best.

On a more serious note, (and sorry, this is off topic but on topic) - has anybody else noticed Sean Maher looks directly into the camera during the God-Make-River-A-Stone spin? It's like he's looking RIGHT AT me. I saw the film a surprising amount of times at early screenings and such (although Joss wins that prize...) - and this is what happened. And nobody else has mentioned it.

[ edited by gossi on 2006-03-06 03:07 ]
Yeah, I think I'm with Gossi. Nolan deserved a nod.

Plus, Mirrormask was last year, so probably, Neil Gaiman should win best original script and Dave McKean should win... many strange categories. But the movie didn't play here, and I haven't actually seen it, so I'm forced to go with Nolan. :-)
Michael Peña (Crash) and Alexander Siddig (Syriana) needed some Supporting Actor love. Their nominations went to the bigger names in their respective films. Bullcrap.
I wish I could play, but my life is still not to the point where I can go out to see movies on a regular basis. Can we do this again in a couple years?
The thing with Batman is it's an origins story which actually plays as a proper origins story.. (I took a child to see it, and half way through he leaned over to me and said "Kevin.. This isn't Batman. We're in the wrong film". But as soon as the momentum got going, he was entranced - it didn't matter any more.)

But then there's the direction. That was a big ship to steer. A large studio looking over something like that, a lot of talent, and, you know, THAT CAR to direct. Give Chris an Oscar. Seriously. People at the Academy snub action films, but they forget how hard some of them are to realise -- and they can actually be intelligent films, too.

Rant. Over.
Oh, man! I forgot MirrorMask! I actually didn't get to see it in theaters, a friend got it for Valentine's Day (threatened her boyfriend with bodily harm if he didn't buy it) and she lent it to us. But my worship and adoration of Neil Gaiman's work is strong.

Gossi- I'm just glad to be nominated. =) And, no, I never noticed that before, but from watching the scene (yes, I already had Serenity in my DVD drive) I can see where that impression would come from.

[ edited by kishi on 2006-03-06 03:21 ]
You could fanwank Simon was looking at the crew (of the ship) behind him. He might have been, I don't know. It's a fantastic take, and I don't think anybody but me noticed it. So, uhm, sorry to those I just ruined that scene for.
Well, I was surprised Jarhead didn't get nominated in some of the major categories, although I'm not sure which nominations I'd have traded. So scratch that.

I'm not sure what the deadline is for nominations (late 2004 can get Oscar nods as well, right?), so I'm not quite certain if either of these count. But anyway:

Danny Boyle should have gotten a directors nod for Millions and Carly Schroeder should have gotten a best supporting actress nod for Mean Creek (although pretty much the entire cast was great in that one). She was only 14 (I think) when the movie came out, but man, that girl could make you feel the pain.

And that concludes my two (ha! I picked more than Joss would let me!) choices.
This may be weird, but I'm going to go with Tim Robbins as supporting actor in War of the Worlds. He just does creepy so well. (hope I got the right year goin' on here!) I think he's way underrated.

I was pleasantly surprised by the movie itself. Which is saying something because I'm not always a fan of remakes, especially of something that classic.
Visual Effects - Star Wars Revenge of the Sith
Christopher Nolan for Batman Begins...best comic film so far. Joss, what do you think of Batman Begins and/or Nolan?
Jarhead - yes. Good point. Not sure where to place it.

I also had a lot of love for War of the Worlds. The story had some misplaced elements (or rather, element: the boy/man 'story') -- but the first 30 minutes are unreal, and overall it had some nice themes, basically playing on the american fears of today (terrorists, pretzels).

I'm too greedy.
Shane Black for the screenplay of "Kiss Kiss, Bang Bang"

GVH wrote:
I'm not sure what the deadline is for nominations

The film has to play for a week in Los Angeles in the previous calendar year. If it has played for a week the year before, then it doesn't count.
Keith - I picked up "Kiss Kiss, Bang Bang" after you spoke about it here last week, and just wanted to say thanks - it was very enjoyable.
Grizzly Man, Best Documentary. Incredible film about a unique guy. (But much love to Murderball, too, which did get the nomination.)
Gossi, glad you enjoyed it! It is just so clever and so much fun - and a great mix of genres. Easily the film I laughed hardest at last year. (Serenity was funny but also with the drama...)
I'm echoing a lot of what everyone else has said..I think Nolan and "Batman Begins" definitely got "jipped" (sp??) however, I haven't seen too many of the nominated films *pouts* but I do think Crash is very deserving.
Gong Li in Memoirs of a Geisha. While Zhang Ziyi got Bafta (and Golden Globe?) nods and I was a bit surprised she didn't for the Oscars, there was something amazingly entertaining about watching Gong Li as a fiery bitchmonster instead.

Oh, and on an Asian rant, maybe 2046, The Promise, or Kung Fu Hustle for best foreign picture. They have so many screwed up policies regarding that (only language of production can submit films and they're only allowed one, weird acknowledgement of things as countries...) While The Promise is silly and over the top epic, considering the other two better movies were snubbed so China would submit it, it does have some merits.
Oh, god. Grizzly Man. With the fox. Made me cry. That definitely deserved to be nominated for the simple fact it was an indescribly great character study.
I kind of adore Peter Jackson, so I'm a little sad he didn't pick up a nom for director.

And I'm with you on Grizzly Man, billz. I just saw it on the Discovery Channel the other night. Absolutely hilarious.
If Batman Begins was eligible (I get confused about timelines), then it should have be nominated. That was one movie I just started smiling in the middle of because it was just so much fun to watch.
Mirrormask, best animated feature. I love Grommit, but the latest movie wasn't any different from previous W&G movies whereas Mirrormask was stunning. Should I be embarrassed to admit I liked Skandar Keynes and Tilda Swinton in Narnia?
Batman Begins...best comic film so far


Hmm. Not sure if I agree, there. Yes, it did dark and it did it with class and style. But still, Spiderman 2 made me feel more, so that's why that's still my #1 comic book movie.

Although I agree, Christopher Nolan was great in Batman Begins. But if we're doing BB-nominations, I think Cillian Murphy did better work. So I'd put him up for best supporting actor.

I also want to chime in with the War of the Worlds love - man, that movie was quite a theatrical rollercoaster ride. It made me feel all drained and tired afterwards - in a good way. The first time those tripods emerged? Shivers. And during the rest of the movie their sound alone had me scared. But, unfortunately, I found it doesn't stand up well to repeated viewings - the things that didn't bother me because of the pure thrill of the movie the first time round, tend to bother me more when I rewatch it on DVD - unlike, for instance, Serenity, which I can keep seeing over and over again.

The film has to play for a week in Los Angeles in the previous calendar year. If it has played for a week the year before, then it doesn't count.


Right. Well, I have no clue if either Millions or Mean Creek meets those criteria (and no idea how to find out either). I've seen Millions mentioned in another recent Oscars article, so maybe it does meet 'em. Anyway, if they can't be nominated this year, then they were overlooked last year :-p
Cillian Murphy, for Batman Begins and/or Red Eye. That's my ten cent's worth.
I'd love to give an original answer here, but I really do have to agree with dashboardprophet and say that Rachel McAdams deserves huge praise! She's been amazing in everything I've seen her in and her performance in 'Red Eye' was most definitely top notch!
I went to an early prescreening of War of the Worlds thanks to UIP. And then I caught it again when it was released. Twice, enough.

However, then somebody else got me to take her kids. And then somebody got me to go with them to see it. 4 times? Too much.

There's a bus which goes by my work, which the brakes make THAT Tripod sound. When the bus goes by and brakes to stop, I still get shivers.
Yeah, gossi, the incredible shots of Tim and the foxes in Grizzly Man! Even if he had never met a bear, his relationship with those little foxes & footage of them was unreally beautiful and heartbreakingly sweet.

Y'know, don't mean to violate the rules of this thread, but where was the love for Summer Glau (best supporting actress), Nathan Fillion (best actor), and Joss Whedon in all the same categories as George Clooney (including, I stubbornly proclaim, best supporting actor)? ;-)
Q'Orianka Kilcher in The New World gets my vote.
Wilson Jermaine Heredia for Rent.
MirrorMask deserved an effects nod, at least...

(And in previous years - Ray Harryhausen wasn't even nominated for Jason And The Argonauts.)
I second the "Mean Creek" suggestion, only possible because I saw it on DVD last week.

Finally, after a really long time, I have a "reduced parenting role/day off" tomorrow, and might be able to actually see a movie from last year. I don't have much to choose from right now.

BTW: My little boy IS the cutest+my personal sunshine of course...except for the ouchy hair yanking.
Not to further derail the topic, but on the subject of superhero movies and Spider-Man 2, I have to say that one of the things that threw me about that movie was the fact that it was the first superhero movie that made me feel like it had gotten super-fight right. If you've got two people with super-human abilities and/or technological enhancements, their fight is going to be like those in Spider-Man 2: Knock-down, drag-out street brawls, with almost no artistry to them at all.

Anyway, I now return you to your previously-scheduled topic.
Ralph Fiennes scared the crap out of me in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. I'm talking chills and everything. That was an extremely powerful performance. I read that book 3 times before seeing the movie. I obviously knew what was going to happen but I have NEVER been more afraid of Voldemort like I was when I first saw that movie. Props to him and I hope he sticks around for the remaining films.
After I finally got to watch Serenity today (yes I know I've been a bad browncoat but due to health probs I wasnt able to watch it while it was in cinemas) I have to say you Joss. *g* You should get an oscar for scarying me so much that you would kill off all our beloved characters. *g*

But honestly I have no idea who else I would have liked to see nominated. Probably its because Im too tired right now.

Joss: So who do you think should have been nominated and wasnt?

[ edited by Princessofdarkness on 2006-03-06 04:10 ]
Rosario Dawson for RENT. She wrings meaning and passion out of every syllable. Blew me away, and I've never really been impressed by her before. (Also, I've seen the original production three times, and that's far and away the hardest part to make sympathetic.)

(And can Wilson and Jesse get "Best Couple?")

Believe it or not, I think Costner was dazzling in "The Upside of Anger". His I've-had-too-many-beers reaction timing was kind of classic.

As for Batty, yes I think it's a hell of an achievement. But Spidey II, hokey on not, still has my withered heart.

Lifetime Achievement: Dakota Fanning. I'm sort of not kidding.
Joss: oh yes of course Dakota Fanning. She's great. And such a cutie to her fans. She would deserve a price :)
Well Kate Beckinsale in Underworld: Evolution should've gotten an oscar! Urm...for er....uhm....the 'Best Looking in a Vinyl Catsuit' category.....uhm...never mind.

Seriously, a lot of movies I have yet to see, and some of the ones that I did see and that really impressed me most are actually pretty well represented up there. Spielberg's 'Munich' was one. Clooney's 'Good night and Good Luck' was another. (Gotta say George Clooney really impressed me this year in more ways than one.)

Hm, didn't really contribute to this thread a lot did I? Ignore me....
Good calls! Dakota Fanning is scary-great. Even doing comedy, she's so adult she's kind of creepy. Her sister is really good, too. I take Spidey over the Bat, too. Spidey feels like the real world, in its way, even if he has to rescue people on Chicago's El train when everything else in the movie takes place in NYC. ;-)

Props to Good Night and Good Luck for making it feel so much like you are in the room with Mr. Murrow and company as the events are happening!
In an act of patriotism, "Be With Me", a film by Eric Khoo, from Singapore, for Foreign Film. It's received considerable acclaim for a film from this tiny island, and is arguably one of the best Singaporean films, yet it was cut from even running for nominations for Foreign Language Film, because the (largely silent) film was deemed to contain too much English dialogue for it to be eligible for the category. Absurd when it was announced, and still absurd now.

Realistically, though, I think Ralph Fiennes was pretty robbed for Best Actor for The Constant Gardener. He definitely deserved at least a nomination.

[ edited by hrlo on 2006-03-06 04:19 ]
Um...The Constant Gardner was hands down one of the best films of 2005. Editing is awesome. Acting awesome. Story awesome. Cinematography awesome. This movie just won one award for best supporting actress, but the movie itself needs more recognition. Maybe it doesn't need (its awesome anyway), but it would've been nice to see it up there.
Constantine - Achievement in Visual Effects
House of Flying Daggers- Achievement in Art Directions

Sin City -Adapted Screenplay (I think this one qualifies)and Film Editing, Cinematography

March of the Penguins - Foreign Feature Film (well, it DID take place in the Antarctic and it was a bunch of penguins...) Oh fine...Best Documentary

Bride and Prejudice- Costume design (cuz I loves me some Bollywood!!)

David Thewlis or Jeremy Irons (Kingdom of Heaven)-Best supporting Actor

Laura Linney (Exorcism of Emily Rose)- Best supporting actress

Stephen Chow (Kung Fu Hustle) - Best Director

Mickey Rourke (Sin City and Domino)- Best Actor, The boy got his mojo back.

Jennifer Carpenter (Exorcism of Emily Rose)-Best Actress
because she was terrifying

Best Motion Picture- SERENITY!!!!!!! Because I don't care what you say Joss....I can choose who I want neener neener. (I was going to choose you as Best Director but I am pouting, so you don't get it)

Obviously, I have not seen the critics' favorites.
Rent, have not yet seen that. But then again, I'm not big on the musical thing, so it wasn't very high on my list.

Believe it or not, I think Costner was dazzling in "The Upside of Anger".


I have not seen The Upside of Anger either, although I've walked by it a couple of times. Never really grabbed my attention, though. Figured I'd end up renting it sometime in the future. I take it it's good then?

As for Dakota Fanning...I'm not sure what to think there. She's so great in most of the movies she does, it's almost scary. So I just can't decide if I'm simply very impressed with, or very scared by, a girl who can act like that at her age. At the moment, I'm leaning towards scared (ah, and I see billz is heading in the direction of scared as well) ;-)

As for Good night, and good luck, I still need to see it. It opened here two weeks ago, and dissapeared from most of the local theatres in the same week it premiered here, grmbl. I really want to see it, though, so I'll probably just take a train and head over to Amsterdam to see it while it's still playing there.

And, of course, joss, good call on Spidey. I love it when I get agreed with :-p
Rented tuxedoes: $75. Stuffed penguins: $35. Almost running over Jennifer Lopez while carrying stuffed penguins: priceless. ;-)
Cillian Murphy in Breakfast on Pluto (best actor)
Brendan Gleeson in Breakfast on Pluto (best supporting actor)
Gavin Friday in Breakfast on Pluto (best musician turned actor)
Bryan Ferry in Breakfast on Pluto (creepiest musician turned actor)

Best song: Wig Wam Bam from Breakfast on Pluto, performed by Gavin Friday.

Best incidental music: Gavin Friday, Maurice Seezer and Quincy Jones for Get Rich or Die Tryin'.

Worst actor/most personality-lacking rapper ever: 50ct in Get Rich or Die Tryin'.

Life time achievement: Director Jim Sheridan.
Okay, I'm confused. Why were there zombies stumbling around through a post-apocalyptic cityscape during that song from Crash?
theonetruebix, I second your objection. Why do they always have to do some weird-ass, no-sense-making number every year? Too bad, too, because I was enjoying the singer and the song. (Isn't she Andrea on West Wing?)

Caroline, I really enjoy Cillian Murphy, so I hope to see Breakfast on Pluto when it comes to DVD.
Rented tuxedoes: $75. Stuffed penguins: $35. Almost running over Jennifer Lopez while carrying stuffed penguins: priceless. ;-)

That was funny. Gotta say I'm also enjoying Jon Stewart and the whole tone of the evening. The theme is clearly 'let's poke fun at Hollywood, the Oscars, and ourselves' which I think is always the best way to go. And Jon joins the short list of brave men who made a funny about Russel Crowe while he was in the room!

Oh and Clooney's acceptance speech was definitely the best in a good long while. "Clooney. Sexiest man '97. Batman. Died in car crash." Hah!
(Isn't she Andrea on West Wing?)

Oh, holy crap. I knew I recognized her, but couldn't place where. You're exactly right.
I've got 60 digital channels and I can't watch the Oscars.

Breakfast on Pluto isn't Neil Jordan's best, but Cillian pulls off a good performance. Gleeson is the best thing in it, though. And Gavin, not because he's a friend, but because he seriously did impress me with his debut performance.
GVH expressed my thoughts exactly with:

Hmm. Not sure if I agree, there. Yes, it did dark and it did it with class and style. But still, Spiderman 2 made me feel more, so that's why that's still my #1 comic book movie.


I would put Batman Begins at number 2 though.

Gotta echo the Shane Black love also, Kiss Kiss, Bang Bang was definitely one of my favourite films of last year. Not sure either should've won but I would've liked Sin City and/or Batman Begins to get a nom in Best Writing, Screenplay Based on Material Previously Produced or Published.
Lol I am slighty giddy at the fact that Joss indirectly answered my Batman Begins question. I'm such a dork. One day I'll meet you Joss. My name is Adriano, remember me! God we need a con in New York City for you to come to and for your schedule to permit!

Okay back to the topic, sorry.

Best Actor: Steve Carrell for 40 Year Old Virgin , lol
Did anyone else think the "Hollywood Tackles Important Issues" montage was kinda shot with the clip from "Day After Tommorow"?

Sure, global warming and all......but, *c'mnon*. By the end of that movie I was more worried about wolves escaping from the zoo after New York freezes over then hiding out in a ship in front of the public library, and causing me near-fatal injury when I go raid the ship for supplies.

Sigh. Stupid, rasafrasin'....

Sorry for the tangent, Joss.
Mmm, Loved "The Upside of Anger". Joan Allen and Kevin Costner were perfect. I thought that the film was really good, too. I heart Evan Rachel Wood.
I really enjoyed Danny Huston in The Constant Gardener and The Proposition (maybe Nick Cave can get a nod for Best screenplay). Hope to see more of him.
Did anyone else think the "Hollywood Tackles Important Issues" montage was kinda shot with the clip from "Day After Tommorow"?

You are not the only one. Well, I don't think it shot the sequence entirely, but it certainly marred it. "Dat After Tomorrow" in the same montage as "To Kill a Mockingbird" and "Network" and "Inherit the Wind"? Um, no.

On edit: I should say that I would not mind if I woke up one morning to discover I had turned into Atticus Finch.

[ edited by theonetruebix on 2006-03-06 04:49 ]
I gotta go with Shane Black too. It was my second favorite film last year.
Wow... it's cool, that several people have already mentioned MirrorMask. Besides such an great movie story-wise, visually it's like nothing else I've seen before. It really should have been nominated for Visual Effects (since I don't think it qualifies as an Animated Movie with all the people in it). I hope more movies break out from the more traditional CGI like MirrorMask and do more stylized different CGI.

Sin City was another movie that should had been nominated for Visual Effects as it was another movie that visually was just so different and incredible bringing Frank Miller's comic to life.

Of course King Kong would have still won that category, but those two movies should have at least been nominated.

Also it's a crime that Danny Elfman wasn't nominated for Best Original Song for the Corpse Bride's song Remains of the Day.

That's all I can think of right now off the top of my head.
I loved the trailer for Jarhead and feel it should have gotten a nomimation at least. My entire fall was taken up seeing Serenity (17 times), so I can't come up with much beyond the trailers I hated and those I liked seeing again.
Movie? Performances? Sorry, everything before Serenity was a blank. Except that I didn't expect to like Batman and I did. A lot.
I do as Joss commands...

I so think Cillian Murphy should've gotten nom'ed for something this year. He was the best thing about Red Eye and Batman Begins, and amazing in Breakfast on Pluto.

Cillian Murphy and Breakfast on Pluto are my why-weren't-they-nominated picks. It was the most exuberant movie of the year, and it was everything I wanted of a movie: moving, funny, great music, fun and intensely free. It had a message, it had a serious heart, but it gorgeously fun and free-wheeling as well.

Also, Woody Allen for Match Point. It's his best work in years, and Jonathon Rhys-Meyer was amazing in it.
You know, with the exception of Kong himself, I was rather disappointed in the movie's effects. Sin City or Narnia should have won that.
I know you said forget Serenity, Joss... but dammit, it should be nominated for a number of things, not the least of which is score. David Newman made an astonishingly good score. It should have been nominated...

And oh yeah, you and the actors did good too. ;)
Did anyone else think the "Hollywood Tackles Important Issues" montage was kinda shot with the clip from "Day After Tommorow"?

All of these montages are silly. They just waste time. I'd rather just get through the show without "salutes to ourselves" and zombie-dance-raves, thank you. ;-)
Gotta agree with Sin City for art direction or effects. Was it blacklisted because of the whole DGA thing with Frank Miller getting co-director credit?

Other than that, there were movies besides Serenity? *g* I'd have loved to have seen it nominated for costuming or makeup. (Because that's all that can be hoped for with a genre film.)

And ITA with the above questioning the Day After Tomorrow placement. Though Jon Stewart's comment after was fantastic. "And those problems were never heard from again!"
On a side note... what's with the DVD attacks? That's like 2 in the last 15 minutes. And they've been meeting silence...
Jon Stewart's up there just being, well, Jon Stewart. He's awesome. :-)

ETA: Montage joke! Hah!

[ edited by pat32082 on 2006-03-06 05:00 ]
I know not many people will agree with me, but I loved 'The Devil's Rejects'. Bill Moseley was pure evil on screen and I think Rob Zombie made a great horror film.

Yes, Dakota Fanning is something special. I was just watching 'Man On Fire' last night and her and Denzel just light up the screen.
I haven't seen any of these movies - all my money goes to buying Sideshow figures! Seriously, I'm not much of a movie goer and prefer to wait and get things on DVD. The only movie I've seen at the theater this year was Serenity! Definitely want to see Rent, Batman Begins, War of the Worlds (actually have these two but haven't watched them yet), Crash, Jar Head and several others that you all have mentioned.

And I didn't see King Kong at the theater but I did play the Xbox 360 game - it was pretty good!!
I recently asked my buds to create new oscar categories (my favorite being my wife's: "Best picture, for real".) Someone (it may have been Espenson) came up with "Best bunch of different performances", the stretching award, and Cillian Murphy would definately be nominated. However, he loses in a photo finish to...

Chewitel! Serenity, Kinky Boots and Four Brothers -- all out at the same time! Take three bows.
On a side note... what's with the DVD attacks?

It's been suggested to me that someone decided they'd overdone it lately with the Internet attacks, but they still neeeded SOMETHING to attack that wasn't going to the theater. ;)
I didn't see many movies this year, except for Batman and Crash, and of course Serenity (six times) so I can't come up with any people who got snubbed. All I want to say is that this is the best Oscars ever, because I get to virtually watch it with my favorite community (albeit normally as a lurker). Oh, and that Jon Stewart chap is quite funny! Thanks Joss, for starting this topic!
Paradise Now

This film has been nominated, but the category hasn't come up yet, and I really hope it wins.

I know Joss said "not recognized by the academy," but I have to talk about this film because it represents my country of Palestine. Now I know what you're thinking: she's gonna go all "Ms. Universe-y" on us, and I'll try not to.

The filmmakers of Paradise Now have grown concerned that the film will lose the Academy Award due to the fact that protestors have signed petitions asking the Academy to either revoke the film's nomination, or to change the country of origin from "Palestine" to "Palestinian Authority."

I have just signed an opposing petition calling for the support of the film. I pointed out in the little "comments" section that this attention just strengthens the film. Whether or not "Palestine" is the country of origin isn't relevant. The film was made in the Palestinian spirit and has stood strong in the international arena. The protestors have only strengthened people's interest in the film--negating their purpose. I applaud the makers of this film and the distrubutors who believed in it. It is an independant film, and no matter the subject matter, that's what it calls for.

And that's why I would make a great Ms. Universe.
I would also like to have seen the young actress who played Lucy in Chronicles of Narnia get some sort of award. She was fantastic.
Oh, yeah... the Batman Begins score should have been nominated as well. Fab.
Omigod! Somebody make a movie with Meryl Streep and Lily Tomlin, NOW!! ;-)

BTW, Joss, thanks for watching (and snarking) the Oscars with us. It makes it so much more enjoyable for ALL of us to enjoy "MSTie-ing" them together! :-)
I hope Paradise Now wins too, because the director is based in the Netherlands. That's about as patriotic as I'll ever get.
Man, if I were onstage giving a speech, I just know I'd get hit with the Giggle Loop. I don't know how anyone makes speeches without laughing out loud.
Altman's acceptance speech was exceptional.
IMForeman, thanks for mentioning Narnia. I loved the set and feel that should have been nominated. I lurve English country homes. And Narnia, the country, was great too.
Chiwetel was also phenomenal (and very, very different from his other performances) in "Melinda & Melinda."

[ edited by TheZeppo on 2006-03-06 05:19 ]
The filmmakers of Paradise Now have grown concerned that the film will lose the Academy Award due to the fact that protestors have signed petitions asking the Academy to either revoke the film's nomination, or to change the country of origin from "Palestine" to "Palestinian Authority."


Thanks for bringing this up, Arabchick. It would be so wrong for a film to be judged based on opinions about its country rather than looking at the film itself. Isn't that just about exactly the definition of racism? I'll look for "Paradise Now" on DVD, Arabchick. :-)

Also, replying to others (including The Man) -- yes, definitely -- yay Altman, and yay Chiwetel!
It's 4am here, I have to sign off. The other mods seem to be asleep/away. Y'all behave now, while we're gone. One last nod: Robert Downey Jr should get an Oscar for being so very, very, pretty.
Good night Caroline!
hee. Morgan Freeman should get nom'ed every year, for the "Best Bunch of Different Performances" award, even if he technically hadn't been in anything last year. Just because.

re: Altman

agreed, he was wonderful. And his movies, even wonderfuller.

re: Robert Downey jr.

He should get some award, any!, because I nearly laughed a lung out at one of his lines in Kiss Kiss, Bang Bang. See, I liked the movie, but it felt like a pure shot of entertainment-candy to me, no nutritious substance at all, so much fun in the moment, but nothing that lingers with you at the end.

[ edited by dottikin on 2006-03-06 05:26 ]
And now, ladies and gentlemen, the Oscars (Think They) Get Down with Rappers. *shudders* ;-)

But big, big YAY for winning! Excellent surprise! :-)

[ edited by billz on 2006-03-06 05:36 ]
Or the other mods are watching the Oscars. We'll behave if Joss does.

[ edited by Lioness on 2006-03-06 05:24 ]
Joss... maybe that's what was missing from Serenity: A kick-butt song! Seems like there were fewer than usual this year. 3? Didn't it used to be 5?
Caroline and billz: thanks for the support. The petition can be found at http://www.petitiononline.com/para222/petition.html. I don't know when PN comes out on DVD, but I'm excited about it because then I can share it with my friends.

I'm getting anxious. This is the only category I care about and I need to get to studying my Biochemistry. Is it wrong that every time my professor says "shunt" I giggle?
Joss... maybe that's what was missing from Serenity: A kick-butt song! Seems like there were fewer than usual this year. 3? Didn't it used to be 5?

Yeah. Where was Bette Midler singing, "My Turn (You Take Care Of Me)"?
Correction Dottikin,

Morgan Freeman was in Danny the Dog aka Unleashed with Jet Li. Let me say, it was actually a good flick and of course Morgan Freeman can do no bad. He was really pleasant in it.
Colbert! Bear attack!
~The 2006 Bad Kitty Awards For Achievement In Cool Stuff (That The Oscars Ignored)~

I would've nominated the films "DiG!", "We Jam Econo" and "The Aristocrats" in the Best Feature Documentary catagory alongside "March of the Penguins" and "Grizzly Man" (because rock stars and comedians should ALWAYS be in competition with penguins and grizzly bears.)

Nominated, Best Lead Actor: Bill Murray for "Broken Flowers", Kevin Bacon for "The Woodsman" and Eric Bana for "Munich".

Nominated, Best Supporting Actress: Maggie Gyllenhaal for "Happy Endings".

Nominated, Art Direction: "Sin City" and "2046".

Nominated, Best Foreign Film: "Caché" (Hidden) and "2046".

Nominated, Adapted Screenplay: "Sin City", "Jarhead" and "Everything Is Illuminated".

Nominated, Best Picture: "Jarhead" and "A History of Violence".

Nominated, Best Onscreen Duo That Aren't Called Jack & Ennis: Val Kilmer & Robert Downey Jr in "Kiss Kiss Bang Bang".

Nominated, Disturbed Me A Little Bit.. But I Think I Liked It: "Palindromes", "Mysterious Skin", "Last Days", "9 Songs" and "The Heart Is Deceitful Above All Things".

Other than that, amazingly, I actually rather approve of this years nominatations...
There must not have been time to get Don Knotts in there.
Ok. I missed that Brock Peters died this year. Suck.

ON EDIT:

There must not have been time to get Don Knotts in there.

He died in 2006, not 2005. Same with Darren McGavin, who was once grilled over dinner by me and a friend of mine when we were young about just how they got his eye that way in The Natural.

[ edited by theonetruebix on 2006-03-06 05:36 ]
I'm going to have to throw my lot in with the Rachel McAdams fans. She's one of those actresses that can make your heart melt (or break) with just a smile. And the fact that she also played the bitchy one in Mean Girls cracks me up.
I’m glad to hear “The Upside of Anger” praise. I have loved Mike Binder since the days of “The Mind of the Married Man.” I would nominate Binder for screenplay and direction, but not supporting actor. He creeped me out too much as Shep, but I guess, if that was his intention, maybe he should be nominated for acting.

And for the made up category, I would create “Best Performance By An Animal, Child, Or Other Difficult Actor.” I won’t make a further comment on that category, but wasn’t Donald Sutherland fantastic in “Pride and Prejudice”?
Eric Bana in Munich
Maria Bello in A History of Violence
David Cronenberg for A History of Violence


P.S. When will audience members at the Oscars learn to wait until the "In Memoriam" portion of the show is over before they applaud? Does everything have to be a popularity contest?
Ok. I missed that Brock Peters died this year. Suck.

I'm still pissed that when Richard Pryor died, there was barely a mention in the american news. Everytime Paris Hilton pukes it's front page, but when Richard Pryor dies, we barely notice. Feelthy media. Ptuey....
Everytime I see Sutherland I see Merrick.
ooh, Bad Kitty, I totally forgot about 2046, maybe because the release date was so screwy, and even though I'm a huge fan of Wong Kar-Wai, his name never pops up naturally for me. But 2046 and Best of Youth (though technically released a few years ago, only debuted in the U.S. last year) should totally, totally have been nominated.

ETA: I adore Lily Tomlin. She has the best laugh in the world!

[ edited by dottikin on 2006-03-06 05:43 ]
Everytime I see Sutherland I see that last shot from Bodysnatchers where he points and screams.
Yeah. Where was Bette Midler singing, "My Turn (You Take Care Of Me)"?

LMAO! :-)

Yes, yes, a theme song! Note for future filmmaking, 'kay, Joss? So, um, "You'll Never See Me" from "Goners" by Bryan Adams, and "She's My Best Friend Forever" from "Wonder Woman" by Randy Newman? ;-)
*shakes head*
my heart just broke.
*shakes fist*

SNUB!

One day. One day, I'm going to win the Academy Award for Best Actress as an Amazonian super hero. Let's see 'em protest THAT.


*cries*
Constant Gardner deserved the editing award...
I'll just say this, Arabchick. "Tsotsi" is also very strong, not some dumb romantic comedy or something. But I'll totally pay to see you at the theatre as WW -- yeah, you go, girl! ;-)
SNUB!

Heh. Just because something doesn't win doesn't make it a snub. Tsotsi is supposed to be amazingly good, and it's based on a novel by Athol Fugard. Not like something with nothing to it won the award. ;)

[ edited by theonetruebix on 2006-03-06 05:46 ]
Arabchick, here's a *hug*! I'll look forward to seeing you as WW!!
...and "She's My Best Friend Forever" from "Wonder Woman" by Randy Newman? ;-)

I can hear it now.

She's a Wonder Woman.
A Woman of Wonders.
When she get's mad
She's a Woman who Thunders.
But she's my best friend.
Best Friend Forever.

She's from Paradise Island
An island of women
Themescra, an Amazon Highland
is a place of no men.
But she's my best friend.
Best Friend Forever.

BFF.


I have not been able to see a Sutherland movie since I found out what a *ick he was in the original Buffy movie

I'm petty that way.

One of these days, the academy will BOW to Joss...

All Bow to Joss!
All Bow to Joss!
All Bow to Joss!
All Bow to Joss!
You people are all actually watching this on tv. I didn't even know the award show was on tonight. I don't even have a tv. I feel so alone.
I'm more upset that the protestors got their way in changing "Palestine" to "Palestinian Territory." It really just breaks my heart. When they announced the nominations and they said Palestine, I was honestly surprised. Would it have been that much of a big deal for them to leave it be? The snub is there in the fact that those 4 syllables were added at the end of Palestine. And that the Academy will bend because of a petition.

I have no doubt that "Tsotsi" is a strong film and I admit that I'm totally biased in favor of "Paradise Now." We all have our movies/actors/actresses we're cheering for.
Serenity for Best Picture and Joss for Best Director, of course. We saw it 3 times (taking our employees the 3rd time), while you'd have to pay ME to see any of the movies actually nominated.

While I love Keira Knightly, I did have the misfortune to see Pride and Prejudice. Anyone who thought that movie or it's actors merited any awards (other than set design, perhaps) needs to run not walk to the video store and buy the A&E version from ~10 years ago.
She's a Wonder Woman.
A Woman of Wonders.
When she get's mad
She's a Woman who Thunders.
But she's my best friend.
Best Friend Forever.


Hey, IMForeman, who needs Randy Newman when they've got US? Excellent lyrics!! ;-P
Steve Carrell - The 40 Year Old Virgin
Joss, Rosario Dawson? She was good, but nothing special. Granted I haven't seen the original stage RENT, hard over here in Finland, but I thought she was too old to play Mimi, who's 19...
Man I really wanted David Stratham to win for Good Night and Good Luck. He was chilling.
Go Reese! not for Walk the Line, b/c I'm not a big watcher of biopics or political movies, but she was beyond kick-ass in Freeway, 10 years ago. I remember watching that movie and falling in love, and no matter how many limp romantic comedies she has made since, I still adore her.

oh, and absolute agree about Pride and Prejudice -- the BBC version is a near-perfect adaptation of Austen's novel, and Jennifer Ehle and Colin Firth are forever in my mind the perfect Lizzie Bennet and Darcy.

[ edited by dottikin on 2006-03-06 06:06 ]
Go Reese!

Totally. Not surprising to me though. Many years ago, when she was much younger and doing stuff like The Man In The Moon (no not the Andy Kaufman picture), you could tell where she was headed.
Ah, Reese is such a sweetie! I was glad she won! DejaThoris, I haven't been watching the whole thing, I usually tune in near the end to just watch the big awards being given out. I was actually watching a couple of episodes Miracles earlier which I haven't yet finished the DVDs and am yet again blown away by another great show that was never given a chance.
And you know, I have to give props to her husband, too. I never could tell if Ryan was the real deal or not, but he kicked ass in "Crash."
I think somebody has been hit with The Giggle Loop.
Arg. Am I the only one who thinks Crash is good but not awesome?
Arabchick, I am definitely planning to buy Paradise Now when it comes out on DVD.

Ed Dantes, which America do you live in? I saw tons of coverage on Richard Pryor's death. Re which, RIP. There's plenty of institutionalized racism in America, no doubt, but I thought Pryor's death was covered fully and respectfully.
Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire should have gotten nominations for Visual Effects, Score, and Costumes. Also, though the part was small, Fiennes should have gotten something for his portrayal of Voldemort.

In my opinion, HPatGoF was the most snubbed film of the year, followed by Revenge of the Sith. Who did Lucas finally t'off to not be nominated for visual effects or costumes? If you ask me, the movie industry had a bad year and took it out on films that actually did well at the box office.
I guess I'm a little late to the party. Anyway here are my snubs:

Thandie Newton for Best Supporting Actress in Crash (although I think you can make an argument for any member of that cast to get a Supporting Actor/Actress nomination)

Sin City for Visual Effects and Cinematography (that film is just oh so pretty to look at)

and

Grizzly Man for Best Documentary
Arg. Am I the only one who thinks Crash is good but not awesome?

You are not alone.
I, for one, am happy to see Lucas' work be snubbed. It, and he, deserve to be at this point. As for effects, I'm sorry, but I don't think a movie that loudly screams with practically every frame "LOOK ITS A COOL ALL-CGI SCENE AREN'T WE JUST AMAZING" is something that deserves any sort of reward at all.

[ edited by theonetruebix on 2006-03-06 06:25 ]
The use of the words "Social Signifigance" there, I find somewhat troublesome. While I think it's certainly germaine for the Best Picture category, I just don't think the impact on contemporary social issues should be a consideration in ANY other category. Best Director should simply be on the Directorial merit, not on any other facet of the film.

I first thought this in the Best Score category, where I honestly felt Brokeback had the weakest score, but it was nominated and won and I'm just not sure that it really earned that on the merit of the score. I don't know, but were I the composer, that would always bug me. If I really earned it.

Know what I mean?
Don't agree with best movie. But what can ya do.
I loved "Crash." *covers ears against dissenters*
Arg. Am I the only one who thinks Crash is good but not awesome?

Nope, definitely not alone.
Oh.My.God.

*is genuinely shocked*
Dude... best picture is one category you should not get played off on... it's the big'un!
Well, it wasn't as good as Munich or Good Night and Good Luck...didn't see Brokeback or Capote.

But it was a good movie, and I think it was kind of an underdog. Hell, Jack Nicholson looked surprised when he read it!
Crash was so very very good. Yaaaay! Although I think it sort of unusual that Reese got such a long time but Best picture got music'd out.
I also have yet to see Brokeback, I'd like to see if its awesome also. I'm sure its good, but Good Night was snubbed, Syriana's screenplay was snubbed, Munich was snubbed. Munich was so suspenseful, I loved it.
pat32082: I loved Crash too.
Rogue Slayer: it was totally the underdog. I didn't see it coming.
That was a film I didn't see in the theater, but bought it immediately when it came out on DVD. Since then, I've watched it with everyone I know who hasn't seen it. Its that kind of movie that you want to show everyone, if not just so you have someone to talk to about it. The whole cast, but especially Terrence Howard and (you were toally right WindTheFrog) Thandie Newton, did a great job. I didn't think it had a chance to win Best Picture. I was definetly surprised.
I also saw a lot of coverage for Richard Pryor's passing. Had a hard time explaining to my kids who he was because I was tearing up so much.
Best Director: Michael Haneke for Caché. It's not my favorite movie of the year (which was Crash) but I'm just so impressed how he handled that movie, it something I have trouble believing anyone else could have pulled off.

And what a shocker with Crash as best film. I was sitting here getting a bit bored, every single one of my predictions went through (didn't predict the shorts and song) and I was felt like a very predictable year. And then Crash goes home and wins the big one. Yikes!

[ edited by Djungelurban on 2006-03-06 06:34 ]
Here's one mod back on (been at work all day), just in time to make the link go somewhere - yep, I'm anal like that. :)

Crash won Best Pic? Jeez. I remember reading the L.A. Times' scathing review when it was released and thinking "there's one I don't need to go see."
Horrific scenes over at the IMDB 'Brokeback Mountain' board right now. Sort of thing that makes you ashamed to be seen as part of the human race. Seriously.
Munich was so suspenseful, I loved it.

Hehe, probably not so suspenseful for those who were alive back then! Which doesn't include me...but thanks to wikipedia, I knew the story. But I agree, it was a wonderful movie. Hey, Spielberg ain't 'da man' for nothing!
Man I really wanted David Stratham to win for Good Night and Good Luck. He was chilling.

Me, too. He's been one of my favorite actors ever since he appeared on "The Days and Nights of Molly Dodd," and I think the role in this movie is representative of his body of work.

P.S. I'm really glad Crash won....
LOL - I just read Joss's tags!
Serenity, best screenplay.
Fillion, best actor
Ron Glass, best supporting
Gina Torres, best supporting
Summer Glau, best actress
Whedon, best director
Ed Dantes, which America do you live in? I saw tons of coverage on Richard Pryor's death. Re which, RIP. There's plenty of institutionalized racism in America, no doubt, but I thought Pryor's death was covered fully and respectfully.

First off, I live in Los Angeles, and my wife heard a mention on the radio. I went to every news site, barely found a line and never saw anything on any TV news except for a tiny moving line at the bottom. Guess I somehow missed it all then.

Secondly, I didn't say a single word about racism. Which is probably because I wasn't thinking about racism in any way. No idea why you even bring it up. I'm just as peeved that Peter Ustinov's death was hardly mentioned at the time. (Not even AICN could be bothered to write a single line).

Arg. Am I the only one who thinks Crash is good but not awesome?

No, same here. Good movie, sure. I liked it. But 'Munich' and 'Good Night' kicked its ass if you ask me. Oh well, almost everybody got something I guess.
DJUNGELURBAN, Michael Haneke is a filmmaking god. Actually. He's more like a filmmaking demon. He's beyond brilliant and will never be rightfully appreciated in his time. I'm sure you've seen "The Piano Teacher" and "Code Unknown" and (afraid to even type the title) "Funny Games" but if you haven't, tough it out and enjoy the sensory bitch-slapping. VERY excited to see his name mentioned on this board.
Clooney got the one award he didn't deserve. His award was clearly Best Screenplay or Director, yet he wins best supporting for Syriana. Best supporting should've gone to the Saudi guy that Clooney's after in the movie. Well...had he been nominated.
And Reese Witherspoon is winning ten years later for "Freeway."
Well, I frickin loved King Kong, went in not expecting much, and it blew my head off.
Ed, I didn't think your comment was racist at all and have to agree about your Paris Hilton comment. Why is she a celebrity in the first place? I almost gag and puke everytime I see her!
Nixygirl - the game was so good it made me want to see the movie, which I'll be getting on DVD. I was a big fan of the original and didn't think I'd really want to see this remake. My kids went and saw it (after playing the game) and absolutely loved it.
Biggest snub of the year:

Kate Dollenmayar in "Funny Ha Ha"

Unlike anything any actress has ever done before.
So, Joss~

What do YOU think of the actual outcome of the Oscars. Thoughts? Opinions? Wishes? Amorphous babble? Inquiring minds WANT to know :-)
No, actually Caché was my very first Haneke experience but I'm sure to check the rest out aswell. I'm especially curious about Funny Games being a bit of a thriller geek, partly just because it's, I presume, highly ironic title.
Just got done watching the awards as well. Thought about doing picture in picture with this thread in the small pic, but, you know, I was busy enjoying the pageantry or something (eyerolling) :) It reminded me there are a number of flicks that I didn't see cause I was totally too busy moderating and stuff ;)
You just have no idea how much, Djungelurban. My first was "Code Unknown" and I had a new favorite contemporary filmmaker. But his masterpiece is "Piano Teacher."

And I'm still shaking from "Funny Games."

Can't wait to discuss them with you!
Nolan - Batman Begins. Crafting a film like that is very hard. And it turned out really interesting. And profitable.


Hans Zimmer and James Newton Howard for the music for Batman Begins. That music is really wonderful. Anyway, I'm glad the beautiful music for Brokeback Mountain won.
Bye now...must get back to watching Sin City with the Rodriguez/Tarrantino commentary.
: )
Revenge of the Sith for Best Visual Effects. Whatever you think of the film (I personally think the first half was a boring and unengaging), the visual effects were head and shoulders the best of the year - perhaps ever.

Also deserving of mention: Christian Bale and Michael Caine for Batman Begins. They gave that movie its heart and its soul.
Tsotsi won Foreign Language Film... nice to see the film that pipped Serenity (and MirrorMask) to the audience award at the Edinburgh Film Festival doing well beyond that somewhat personally irksome plaudit.
Disagree re: Revenge of the Sith. It was well done, but none of it blew me away and none of it was anything we haven't seen before. It also didn't just become part of the movie for me, I always had the feeling that hey there's some vxf. It was certainly good stuff, as always from them, but I didn't think it merited any particular recognition. Your mileage may vary.

Bale and Caine were most excellent in Bats Begins.
Good Night and Good Luck was a GREAT movie, but I knew it wasn't going to win. It was too intelligent. While I would have been in awe and in agreement if it had won, I'm glad Crash got it instead. Both movies give people something to think about afterward, and honestly, the issues brought out in Crash are more universal and pressing to more people than in Brokeback Mountain. Racism is such a pervasive issue, it crosses all other lines - economic, political, sexual, etc. I also loved Paul Haggis's quoting Bertolt Brecht, because that quote is ultimately the paradigm that drives many artists to create challenging works.

I'm not saying the issues in Brokeback are unimportant, but that movie is sort of like Titanic - decent to watch once, but over exposed and ultimately you feel empty afterwards. At least I did. It was "Love Story, but with Gay Cowboys." I still feel the story was missing a crucial transition between the two men going from being work buddies to lifelong lovers.
Ed, I didn't think your comment was racist at all and have to agree about your Paris Hilton comment. Why is she a celebrity in the first place? I almost gag and puke everytime I see her!

Oh I know! When does it end? How can someone be famous for being a spoiled, talentless rich kid who somehow manages to think the world of herself? I swear, ten years from now people will make jokes on VH1 about why in the world she was somehow considered Ptuey! Let's speak of her no more...

Clooney got the one award he didn't deserve. His award was clearly Best Screenplay or Director,"

Yeah I was kinda hoping he'd get that one. There was something very powerful about the pure and basic style of "Good Night"'s visual storytelling.
You know what I think is interesting is how my mind didn't even cross the 'Brokeback Mountain didn't win because it has gay men in it' line until the news afterward, where there was a guy on it using his screen time to tell everyone how horrible we all are. I honestly think that Crash is worthy of the award, and it's absolutely fantastic that it won. It was very well done, its message didn't blare at you, it was subtle and gave messages not only on racism but also on what you value the the most. I think it did that very well. Had it been done differently, if it was screaming at you in the face its message, I wouldn't've liked it.
Oh seriously Firefly Flanatic? Man, I have wanted to buy it, and I'm thinking I may just.

Michelle Williams in BrokeBack, kinda broke my heart, she was good.
As was Matt Dillan, in Crash.
Plus, I'll vote for Tim burton, I love his stop motion stuff;
King Kong for art direction;
Memoirs of a Geisha for cinematography;
Charlie and the Chocolate factory for costumes;
Crash for directing and editing;
Star Wars for make up (only cause I know one of the guys);
Brokeback Mountain for music;
Paradise Lost best foreign;
Walk the Line sound mixing, and Joaquin for best actor (just love him).
I haven't seen enough of the movies to pick a best actress or best movie as yet.
So there ya go. Nix list.
[T]he issues brought out in Crash are more universal and pressing to more people than in Brokeback Mountain


Well, I see what you're saying, but that would never be my measure of what makes a good movie. Not having seen either, that's about as much as I can say on that one.

What I really want to know is: how did Jon Stewart do in the final appraisal?
It's inevitable, if BM had won there would be people screaming that it only won because it was a controversial subject and because it didn't win there will be those who claim it is because it had gay leading characters.

[ edited by Firefly Flanatic on 2006-03-06 07:05 ]
Best Animated Short: Don Hertzfeldt - The Meaning of Life
Definitely Grizzly Man for Best Documentary. What an amazing film.

And yay Joss for the Spidey 2 love! ...Not so much for the love of The Shriek-y Annoying One...AKA Dakota Fanning. War of the Worlds sucked, as has most of her filmography.

And Crash won Best Picture...wow...I was slightly pissed...
I stopped taking the Oscars seriously with Chariots of Fire. The fact Serenity was ignored only reinforces my decision. I went to see two films last year. Batman Begins, and Serenity. I made a pact with a friend that I'd go see Batman Begins with him, if he went to see Serenity with me. By the way he now has the DVD set too, and when he found out his favorite author, Orson Scott Card, was also a fan, my buddy was SOLD on this. He's in some ways a bigger fan now than I am. LOL! I'm sure all those other films are great and blah blah blah...

Serenity was the only film last year that I HAD to see in the movie theater. I only wish I could put a golden naked guy on the mantle of every single person who had anything to do with the film. Though why anyone would want a golden naked guy on their mantle is beyond me.

...

(actually I lied. Three movies. I had to see Hitchhiker's last year too, but I only appreciated it out of respect for The Dead Tall One. The end result was more like a vain attempt at a racy family film. Serenity was the only movie I HAD to see last year that was actually GOOD. Batman Begins by the way was very ...okay, and I'm glad my friend talked me into going.)

[ edited by ZachsMind on 2006-03-06 19:23 ]
Nixygirl, I'm talking about the xbox 360 version, the graphics were amazing on a HDTV. I haven't seen it on other platforms or the regular xbox so I don't know how good it looks on those. But it was a lot of fun.
I only wish I could put a golden naked guy on the mantle of every single person who had anything to do with the film.

And so ZachsMind reveals his next arts and crafts project. I won't ask who he's going to use as the model.
I think he should use Mal as a model! That shot of him sitting naked on the rock will do!


[ edited by Pastor Of Muppets on 2006-08-13 08:10 ]
I'm glad Clooney won just so we could hear his acceptance speech.

I'm proud to be 'out of touch' too, George.
Well, Tony Curtis did come out (ahem) a few weeks ago and say, rather bluntly, that he and other members of the Academy were simply not going to see 'Brokeback Mountain'. For that very reason (the gay aspect).

So, it seems that there is actually some truth in that whole it-didn't-win-because-it-has-gay-leading-characters theory.

He actually said (and I quote) "John Wayne wouldn't like it."
Ed, I didn't think your comment was racist at all and have to agree about your Paris Hilton comment. Why is she a celebrity in the first place? I almost gag and puke everytime I see her!

Oh I know! When does it end? How can someone be famous for being a spoiled, talentless rich kid who somehow manages to think the world of herself? I swear, ten years from now people will make jokes on VH1 about why in the world she was somehow considered Ptuey! Let's speak of her no more...

Clooney got the one award he didn't deserve. His award was clearly Best Screenplay or Director,"

Yeah I was kinda hoping he'd get that one. There was something very powerful about the pure and basic style of "Good Night"'s visual storytelling.

He actually said (and I quote) "John Wayne wouldn't like it."

Not to be disrespectful, but so what? We live our lives now by what John Wayne may have not liked? Pff, makes me even more glad they did that 'old cowboy movies' clip reel with the gay subtext humor.

[ edited by EdDantes on 2006-03-06 07:26 ]
So, it seems that there is actually some truth in that whole it-didn't-win-because-it-has-gay-leading-characters theory.

But then again Ang Lee won for Best Director, and Philip Seymour Hoffman for Capote. I mean, they had to have seen those two movies before voting for those two, right? So I don't know what to make of it. But yeah, I was rooting for Brokeback as well.

[ edited by kylie on 2006-03-06 07:23 ]
Wow Bad Kitty, I didn't know that. Funny thing is, Tony Curtis is one of the actors that I always wondered if he was secretly gay. What's really funny is that in Spartacus, the movie he was in with Kirk Douglas, had a lot of homo-erotic undertones to it and if I recall, I remember seeing a documentary about him or Douglas that said just that and that it was deliberate and not accidental or something people were misunderstanding.

[ edited by Firefly Flanatic on 2006-03-06 07:24 ]

[ edited by Firefly Flanatic on 2006-03-06 07:26 ]
Well, Tony Curtis did come out (ahem) a few weeks ago and say, rather bluntly, that he and other members of the Academy were simply not going to see 'Brokeback Mountain'. For that very reason (the gay aspect).

He's not seeing Brokeback because of the gay element? Tony Curtis, who told a British gay mag that he had sex with men when he was younger? I find that...sad. You'd think he'd be a bit more open. Or at least not so vehemently against it!
...Tony Curtis is gay anyway; he's just in denial.

I mean, you did see Spartacus, yes?

...I really wanted Munich or Brokeback to win...
Well, I see what you're saying, but that would never be my measure of what makes a good movie. Not having seen either, that's about as much as I can say on that one.

Except when you look at this year's nominees, it almost does have to be one of the measures. All of them - even Capote to some extent - had social relevance.

On many levels, Brokeback was a beautiful movie. The acting was marvelous. Ang Lee deserved the Oscar (though the other directors deserved it, too). The cinematography was gorgeous. The story, though, was simple and weak. There were some powerful elements and scenes in the movie, but I needed to see something more in the first third of the movie to convince me it was a credible sequence of events. It's missing something. As a result, it is not in my list of top contenders for Best Picture.

It's inevitable, if BM had won there would be people screaming that it only won because it was a controversial subject and because it didn't win there will be those who claim it is because it had gay leading characters.

In Hollywood? I don't think so.

I think it boils down to this: which of the movies am I likely to watch more than once? Crash is one of them (I've seen it twice, and now own a copy - for use in some of my classes). Good Night and Good Luck is one I'd like to see again. I might want to own that one too. Brokeback Mountain is one I might watch once more on cable, mostly for Jake Gyllenhaal's performance and for the awesome sheep, but I don't think I'll buy it.
I just saw Upside of Anger, and have to second the respect for Costner. It's probably the first performance of his I've actually really liked.

And, I know it was a competitor of Serenity's last autumn, but Cronenberg's History of Violence? Totally snubbed.
No contest. Eric Bana got zero love for his incredible performance in Munich. I was pulling for Phoenix among the nominees, but Bana didn't even get a mention. Crap.

Of course, it's not widely known, but the BAFfler Awards were also telecast this evening. (We never get any publicity, because we have to go up against the Oscars.) Among the winners:

Best film: Serenity
Best lead actor: Nathan Fillion, Serenity
Best lead actress: Reese Witherspoon, Walk the Line
Best supporting actor: Chiwetel Ejiofor, Serenity
Best supporting actress: Summer Glau, Serenity
Best adapted screenplay: Tony Kushner and Eric Roth, Munich
Best original screenplay: Joss Whedon, Serenity
Best original score: David Newman, Serenity
Best director (TIE): Christopher Nolan, Batman Begins, and Joss Whedon, Serenity

It's more fun to live in my world.
Well, Tony Curtis did come out (ahem) a few weeks ago and say, rather bluntly, that he and other members of the Academy were simply not going to see 'Brokeback Mountain'. For that very reason (the gay aspect).

OMG, Bad Kitty, that's so disturbing! Not to mention, Mr. Curtis had a famous role in Some Like It Hot, in which he played a character who hid from the mob by going in drag for most of the movie. And, yeah, Spartacus, too. What a hater, and a hypocrite besides! Shame, Mr. Curtis, shame! :-(

I didn't see Crash, Walk the Line or Munich, & I did see Brokeback Mountain, Capote and Good Night & Good Luck. While I was watching Brokeback, I was thinking how beautiful the cinematography was, but that the film itself was not all that involving, mostly because I couldn't understand half of Heath Ledger's dialogue, but I did keep thinking about the story afterwards, maybe because it covered such a long period of time in the characters' lives. I really admired GN&GL and David Strathairn (always, always great), but it dragged a little near the end, when it started relying on more clips of Sen. McCarthy than scenes of the characters in Mr. Murrow's group. I liked Capote the best, and a big yay to Philip Seymour Hoffman, not only for that film but for everything he's done. Big yay to Reese Witherspoon, even though I haven't seen Walk the Line, she's been great in everything else, including Cruel Intentions (with SMG), Election (GREAT movie!), Pleasantville and the Mira Nair version of Vanity Fair she was in.

So, until I see Crash, I'd have to agree that Brokeback was not the best movie of the year, nothing to do with the characters' sexual orientation, but just because it wasn't the best. But it was very good and certainly worth seeing, but I'd recommend GN&GL & Capote first. And I agree that Mr. Hoffman and Ms. Witherspoon deserved their awards, too. :-)

Best Animated Short: Don Hertzfeldt - The Meaning of Life

OMG, I love Don Hertzfeldt! I didn't know he had a new short out! Will have to check his website!! ;-)

Lastly, SNT, I thought Mr. Stewart's monologue was not that good, but his spontaneous jokes were much more funny, like after the rappers won & his remark that "none of those problems were ever heard from again," and the "political ads" throughout (obviously with Stephen Colbert's voiceover, & he just *rocks* of course) were awesome! So, overall, maybe an A- for Mr. Stewart.
There was this medium-sized movie called Serenity that was actually pretty good this year...
funny is that in Spartacus, the movie he was in with Kirk Douglas, had a lot of homo-erotic undertones to it and if I recall, I remember seeing a documentary about him or Douglas that said just that and that it was deliberate and not accidental or something people were misunderstanding.

Ah yeah, the famous 'Oysters and Snails' bit? They even cut that out at the time. They put it back in years later, except they had to dub in Laurence Olviers voice with because the audio was so old and bad. Of course, sir Ollie was dead by then so Anthony Hopkins did the voiceover in a near perfect imitation.

And there was even more gay subtext in 'Ben Hur' even though both the writer and director never told Charlton Heston, who didn't have a clue. It always cracks me up.
LOL about clueless Charlton Heston! I'll never be able to watch that movie again without cracking up now!
The story, though, was simple and weak. There were some powerful elements and scenes in the movie, but I needed to see something more in the first third of the movie to convince me it was a credible sequence of events. It's missing something. As a result, it is not in my list of top contenders for Best Picture.

Nebula 1400, that's exactly it! You have described exactly why I admired Brokeback Mountain, but didn't love it or think of it as "best."
I did not see the Tony Curtis quote. Are we sure it was being said seriously?

I actually have a copy of Crash that was sent to my Mom to get her vote for the SAG awards. (I took a leave of absence years ago, but if they'll send me DVD's I'll gladly start paying dues again.) I have not had a chance to watch it yet because it seemed like an adult movie, and I have very little time when my son is not looking over my shoulder. I guess I have something to look forward to.
There was this medium-sized movie called Serenity that was actually pretty good this year...

Yeah, but in this game, we don't include Serenity for consideration. Still, it should have been a contender for Best Original Screenplay if nothing else; but I genuinely enjoyed what Paul Haggis had to say in his acceptance speech. I also liked George Clooney's acceptance speech.
They couldn't possibly have a movie like Serenity be a contender because then people would see what a great movie is and will expect that from now on. It's better this way, we wouldn't want to overwhelm Hollywood and expect them to actually come out with great movies on a regular basis. I mean, doesn't the world need movies like "Big Momma's House 1 & 2"?!
newcj, Crash was rated 7 in Sweden. This essentially meaning everyone since kids under 7 are allowed if accomanied with an adult. There are some slight nudity and a lot of cursing but no real violence and anything that should be considered traumatizing to young children. Overall, I view Crash as a safe movie, you can go ahead and see it.
Just saw this thread - whew!

I'm a bit disappointed Crash won best film - I liked it, but thought it was definitely flawed (and hardly subtle), and certainly not best-picture material. But oh well... it's far better, I suppose, than many other films (Titanic? Forrest Gump?) that have won in previous years.

To answer Joss's original question, the top 5 snubs this year:

5. Ralph Fiennes, A Constant Gardener
4. Shane Black, Kiss Kiss, Bang Bang (best screenplay)
3. Caché, best foreign film
2. David Cronenberg, A History of Violence
1. Grizzly Man, Best documentary
Best supporting actress: Summer Glau, Serenity

Meh.

I'd actually give Best Actress to Glau. No offense to Fillion who is without question the film's anchor, but there's places where River's actually carrying the film. Whedon said in the DVD commentary that he had to add a scene to the film near the beginning after the cold open where River and Mal have a moment together, because the early audiences weren't grasping that Mal is actually the anchor for the main plot arc and River is just the catalyst. Why is that? Glau was that effective as an actress. That's why. She did so much with so little. At one point it's just her voice that we hear and a younger actress is playing her, but for a woman who can perform from the feet up, being restricted to just her voice? That's just another day at the office. It's easier to pull back convincingly than it is to go broad.

She had to hand the show off to him in that moment, because up until that point the script required that Glau carry the open. To someone who was completely new to the series and watching the film cold? The first five or ten minutes are telling you this all hinges on her. Watch this character because she's the fulcrum upon which all this rests and then we get into the ship Serenity and it's suddenly the captain that we're watching. Would be a bit of a shock to someone who didn't really understand what was going on.

Glau took that "please God make me stone" mouthful of a speech and sold it convincingly. Not easy to do. I'd like to see Meryl Streep try to do that! LOL! I'd also like to see any of the previous Best Actress nominees of recent years try to pull off a role like River Tam. Bet they couldn't do it. Not a one. Glau was able to do two major fight scenes, and then have that powerful touching moment with Sean Maher where she says "bullet in the brain pan, squish!" If that's not Oscar calibre, no one in their right mind should WANT to be Oscar calibre.

A woman with major acting chops AND the ability to do most of her own stunts? HELLO! There's that moment right after the roller coaster shot where Gina Torres and Summer Glau are exchanging glances that tell dialogue you couldn't write, and Summer Glau's look is amazing. It's raw and gritty and it's like River is stepping into Zoe's shoes for a cat's breath and BEING Zoe. Communicating to Zoe on her level. Most other actresses would have needed a line. A word. Something to convey the meaning. Not Glau. She just needed an attitude.

Summer Glau didn't get nominated. That alone should cause the entire planet to disregard the Academy as a worthless institution with no validity or digntity whatsoever.

[ edited by ZachsMind on 2006-03-06 08:08 ]
Thanks Djungelurban, I won't be so careful then.
Okay, I'm confused. Why were there zombies stumbling around through a post-apocalyptic cityscape during that song from Crash?

I thought that was one of the weirdest - and hokiest - moments of the night! (It wasn't zombies, btw, just bad non-actors trying to replicate a scene from Crash, in live slow-motion. My friends and I thought it should win for unintentionally funniest moment of the night....)

Other snubs, not mentioned in my previous post:
Eric Bana, Munich
Steven Carrell and Catherine Keener, 40-year-old Virgin (along with the screenwriters)
Maria Bello, A History of Violence
Laura Linney and Jeff Daniels, The Squid and the Whale

[ edited by acp on 2006-03-06 08:28 ]
newcj, I'd say it depends on how old your son is, his maturity level, and your level of parental caution. I'd definitely consider it an "adult" movie, in that it's pretty adult themes that are discussed, some horrific and really hateful language that might be pretty hard for a kid to process, and quite a bit of violence.
I know I'd definitely think twice before taking a child of 7 or 8 to see it, despite the Swedish rating...
On a related tangent, when I saw Munich, there was a 6- or 7-year-old girl sitting right behind me, and it bothered me through the whole film (which is far more disturbing and violent even than Crash, and has some very complex and adult themes) that she was there - it was so inappropriate for a kid her age, and I kept hearing her ask her parents questions, like "Why are those people shooting at them?" that broke my heart. I couldn't believe they kept her there through the whole movie.
Aside from the offensive stupidity of his statement, the thing that I found, personally, most disturbing and amazing about what Tony Curtis said was that it reinforced what I'd heard before about Academy voters not even watching the nominated films. For whatever reason (doesn't really matter WHY) the people who do the all-important voting aren't watching the films they're voting for. I've read two other actors say in interviews that they don't watch all the nominated films. To me, that is just amazing and mind-numbingly stupid. I find myself wondering exactly what percentage of the Academy actually sees all five Best Picture nominated films? (Let alone the films nominated in the other catagories.) If the Academy voters HAD watch the films in order to vote (if they all had to, for example, attend special Academy screenings and register) would the outcome be different?

I wonder if perhaps strapping them to chairs and clamping their eyes open (a la 'A Clockwork Orange') might yield a better, more legitimate result... I mean, say what you will about the critics awards, at least you can be fairly certain they've SEEN the movies they vote for.
I want to Tivo nothing but the ZachsMind channel for a while...maybe we need an oscar category for "indefatigably unshakeable 'verse loyalist." I'll wrestle you for it, ZM, but I won't bet on myself.
I know several other people have already said something similar, but I am incredibly disappointed that Crash got Best Picture. Was it a good movie? Yes. But the best of the year? Not by a long shot!
If the Academy voters HAD watch the films in order to vote (if they all had to, for example, attend special Academy screenings and register) would the outcome be different?

That's the way it works for foreign films and a few others - the shorts, I think, and maybe the documentaries. They're shown in special Academy screenings, and members can only vote if they've attended screenings for all the nominated films.
i like that, but I've also heard people complain because it's so much less convenient than being able to watch films on their own schedule, or on DVDs in their own homes. And I think you could argue that allowing them to see films on DVDs actually gets far more academy members to see far more of the films - it's just impossible to determine which ones, or require it for voting.

My best friend's father is an Academy member, and I know he is incredibly concientious about seeing every single nominated film before he votes. So far all the members I'm sure are negligent, there are also some who really are careful.... But I agree: It drives me nuts that people would vote without having seen all the nominations.
Good points about the size and importance of the role River plays in Serenity, ZM. I'll buy Summer as best actress, rather than "supporting!" :-)

That alone should cause the entire planet to disregard the Academy as a worthless institution with no validity or digntity whatsoever.

Oh, dude, there's so many other reasons that I had already come to this conclusion, that snubbing Summer is just another one on the list! ;-)
I'm very angry that A History of Violence didn't get more noms. Maria Bello and Viggo Mortensen deserved nominations for their acting and David Cronenberg totally deserved a directing nom.
I agree with ArchimedesScrew, Miranda July in any relevant category (best actress/director/screenplay) for Me and You and Everyone We Know. The movie really resonates.
Heck, Samuel L. Jackson said in an interview that he leaves his ballot out on the coffee table and lets his family and cook, housekeeper, anyone passing by vote for him. Which is the level of respect I think the awards deserve. Sorry, I like following the Oscars for cheese factor, but I don't take them seriously in any sense. I like the lift they give to various people whose careers need promotion or whatever, but do I think they're valid? Well this year's best picture winner pretty much answers that question.

The problem with Crash is that heavy-handed message films seem like high-minded, serious art, but rarely age well and quickly lose relevance as art. The only political art that really survives the test of time seems to be satire, perhaps because satire has the enduring power and energy of viciousness and humor, which never goes out of style. The Oscars (along with every other artistic award committee, I'm looking at you, Nobel Lit committee) love the kind of movies that are supposed to be good for you, addressing a serious topic in a lecture-y type of way, and I wonder, how many people actually get their minds changed by lectures?
Arg! How could I forget The Squid and The Whale?! That movie is brilliant--and, if you are a child of divorce, painfully funny/real.
Can't comment on many of the movies, since I have not seen many of the nominated ones, and therefore am unable to accurately assess. However, I will give my comments on Jon Stewart as host.

Though Crystal is a favorite, I enjoyed Stewart as host. I like his brand of sarcastic, mocking political humour. The opening sequence was very funny and inevitably politics was going to be part of his shtick. Those who did not know him may not have found him very good. Not all segments were good but overall – I thought he did a good job.

But he is an outsider to this group and he did not shy away from that. "Tonight is the night we celebrate excellence in films, with me, the fourth male lead in 'Death to Smoochy,'"

However, when the sarcasm and mocking were turned towards the Hollywood establishment … not sure he was well received.

For instance, he pointed to a huge statue of the Oscar behind him and said, "Do you think if we all got together and pulled this down, democracy would flourish in Hollywood?" in obvious reference to the toppling of the statue of Saddam Hussein.

Another favorite target of his – the news media – was not spared when he pointed out that both "Good Night, and Good Luck" and "Capote" were important films about journalism's "relentless pursuit of the truth," adding, "Needless to say, both are period pieces."

Finally, another line that had me ROTFL was his line about George Clooney’s self-acknowledged status as a ladies man (he admits to never wanting to remarry) - "Good Night, and Good Luck," was "not only the sign-off of Mr. Murrow, it's also how Mr. Clooney ends all his dates."

That is my two cents worth. And so ladies and gentlemen, to all a good night ;)
Er, yeah, I knew they weren't zombies. That was sort of the inherent point of my remark.
Ok acp. Good to know. I'm back to being pretty careful. It might be time for the hateful language discussion, but I'd like to watch something like that without him first to know whether it is appropriate yet. He loves action so much it would be hard to keep him away if he is not occupied with something pretty rivitting

I have been trying to find a time to watch I heart Huckabees without him around because of the rating and because I don't have a clue what is actually about.

Sort of Off Topic: The ads and clips I saw from 40-year-old-virgin really turned me off...along with the title, actually. Is that chest waxing scene pretty indicative of the rest of the movie? I ask because I keep hearing (actually reading) that it is a funny movie, but if that is the humor, it is really not for me.
Sort of Off Topic: The ads and clips I saw from 40-year-old-virgin really turned me off...along with the title, actually. Is that chest waxing scene pretty indicative of the rest of the movie? I ask because I keep hearing (actually reading) that it is a funny movie, but if that is the humor, it is really not for me.

I'm one of those people who didn't like this movie. It's one you definitely don't want to watch with kids, and the waxing scene is one of the better scenes in the movie.
newcj, I saw "I <3 Huckabees" on cable, and it's not a problem for kids, it's just weird. I don't think there was any nudity, but there may have been some cursing. Lots of talk, talk, talk. Definitely don't remember any violence, apart from my violent indifference to the film itself. I didn't bother sticking around for the ending -- but maybe I just didn't get it. ;-)
There's a brief sex scene in Huckabees. It's bizarre. Happens in mud. Lots of mud. It's still warranting of an R-rating though.
HITCHHIKER'S GUIDE -- Best Adapted Screenplay

(As for Reese ... JACK THE BEAR, way back when. Wonderful movie.)
I've been going through a fairly signficant film noir obsession and I was ecstatic to see a tribute during the Oscars presented by (a slightly out of it) Lauren Bacall, who looks pretty great for an 81-year old woman. I <3 The Big Sleep.

Anyway Sin City definately should've been at least nominated for at least cinematography, it's a pretty breathtankingly shot movie.
Sort of Off Topic: The ads and clips I saw from 40-year-old-virgin really turned me off...along with the title, actually. Is that chest waxing scene pretty indicative of the rest of the movie? I ask because I keep hearing (actually reading) that it is a funny movie, but if that is the humor, it is really not for me.

I'm one of those people who didn't like this movie. It's one you definitely don't want to watch with kids, and the waxing scene is one of the better scenes in the movie.


If that is one of the better scenes, I don't want to watch it with or without kids. Thanks.

Bilz, Thanks. I'm kind of intrigued now, even though I may be bored later. We shall see. In regards to my son, I can deal with cursing, within reason. It is not like a word or two has not slipped out at home now and then. (hangs head in shame) Nudity I can also deal with. Explicit sex, I try to avoid...in the movies my son is exposed to that is, though I seem to be pretty good at avoiding it at other times too. ;-) I have shamelessly covered his eyes at times just like we do with scary stuff on the basis that they are going to get all smoochy. He is just at the right age to consider it as gross as the blood and gore that it is also my job to cover his eyes to avoid. I wonder how much longer I'll get away with that...
The funniest stuff in "40 Year Old Virgin" was the over-the-top raunchy dialogue. Never gratuitous, though, all in good fun.
I pretty much think 40-Year-Old Virgin is one of the top 5 best comedies in the last 10 years. It works because it cares about it's characters in a very real way. It treats Andy (the main character) with a sort of respectful sympathy and never goes for the easy, cruel virginity jokes.
The DVD of 40 Yr Old Virgin is the "unrated" version, and I've heard from my sister that it is very kid-inappropriate. Lots of boobies, etc. It also has more swearing and also stretches the runtime to over 2 hours, and I've read that all the new footage undermines the sweetness of the movie. So, I really suggest you try to find the theatrical cut of the movie, which was one of my fave movies of the year, and probably the best theatrical experience all year. Saw it w/ a lively audience in a 70% full theater, and really, when a movie is rocking and people are genuinely laughing, it makes a comedy just about perfect.
I'm up for the 40 Yr Old Virgin love, it was a wonderful, sweet movie.
I saw the unrated version of 40 Year Old Virgin and didn't overly like it. I said at the time: too long, bad last act, too much.

And I bet that's because of the unrated thing.

And, seriously for a moment; March of the Penguins won best documentary? Kai is right: what won "Bet Documentary, for real"? Couldn't we have had the story about Tim in Crizzly Man, a failed actor who lived in the wilderness each year with crizzly bears, trying to shoot a bear documentary, who then got killed and eaten by them? I suppose it's not as family FUN.
*Wakes up*

Crash? Watched it mildly entertained, then forgot every single moment of it the minute it ended. Did. not. resonate. at. all. Pah!

But oh with the joy of Philip Seymour Hoffman winning best actor. So deserved for Capote, but everything else he's ever done as well.
Caroline, even the burning car scene? That usually sticks with you...
Seriously, I couldn't remember anything about it. Apart from a sense of Matt Dillon's excellent performance. I find films hard to like when there aren't any characters I can empathise with.
I found Crash interesting - a great movie - but I wouldn't have picked it as Oscar winning worthy with the competition. Overall, though, mostly well deserved wins, and a great year for film.
Well, mornin' all. I see I've missed some brouhaha overnight. Can't really weigh in on much of this as I've only seen Brokeback recently, which I loved with a fiery, same-sex passion. Snub? I recently took part in a John Lewis in-store promotional video. I was moving. I tackled the big issues (JL vs Selridges). Recognition in the wider community? sigh, none.
It was a shame Gong Li didn't get nominated for Best Supporting Actress. She would have been my choice.
I find the critical success of Paul Haggis mind-boggling. Million Dollar Baby (which he wrote) was well acted, but so manipulative and false it just made me angry.

Crash had some even greater performances, and some genuinely good scenes, but it was so convoluted and hinged on so many unbelievable coincidences, I just got angry again. Specially when the spiritual middle-eastern singing that is supposed to signify profundity flooded the whole soundtrack.

Should've been there (in some category or other): A History of Violence, War of the Worlds, Serenity, Kung Fu Hustle.

[ edited by Special Agent Dale Cooper on 2006-03-06 12:48 ]
Just saw Mirrormask this weekend, and think that Jason Barry playing Valentine deserved a nomination at the least. He did a wonderful job, especially considering you never get to see his face. Stole the show.

Also, Kiss Kiss, Bang Bang was one ofthe best films of last year.

Did March of the Penguins win best doc? It doesn't surprise me, but I'm mystified by the amount of coverage it got. I mean hasn't anyone ever seen a BBC wildlife doc? Like that Planet Earth that started last night. They are so much better than March of the Penguins.
I thought Gong Li was the best thing in Memoirs of a Geisha, which underwhelmed me a bit compared to the book, which I really liked. It looked beautiful, but didn't really inspire me as a story.

I fear Dakota Fanning though.
I haven't seen any of the films that won. Or come to think of it, most of the films that got nominated either.


But out of the films that got nominated for Visual Effects, I would have liked to have seen "War of the Worlds" win. The effects used in that movie were subtle, understated and stunningly realistic. Contrast Spielberg's "less is more" VFX approach with Lucas' "throw everything at the screen and lets hope it sticks" philosophy.
I would have liked to see Brokeback Mountain win emotionally. But I saw it twice and I loved it and it made me cry the first time. The second time I felt a little cheated, as if I'd read a very effective tearjerker romance novel with very little substance to sustain it over time. Sort in the Bridges of Madison County league, with cuter guys.

Capote I liked a lot, just a riveting performance by Seymour Hoffman. Syriana I didn't like visually - all I can think of is 'YELLOW'.

Good night and good luck I liked a lot visually, but didn't grab me.

Batman had the unlikable characters problem, I have to say I've always been keen on Michael Keaton's interpretation of the role. This latest Batman had all the right ingredients, but the secret magic one was missing. And what was Liam Neeson on?

North Country was excellent, a Silkwood for the 00's. Is Charlize Theron the new Meryl Streep?

A film I really enjoyed was the quirky 'Matador', Pierce Brosnan and Greg Kinnear just made that a joy to watch.

Did I miss any nominated films?
Seriously late to the party but here is my snubbed movie anyway:

‘The Edukators’ for best foreign film. A really interesting German movie which lots of people should see. (Not sure if it fits into the 2005 requirements, I always get confused about that. ) Anyhow, Sophie Scholl, important and all that, but can we please not live in the past for a change and actually watch a movie that talks about society as it is now?
I used up all my babysitter goodwill going to see Serenity many times in 2005 so I can't comment *sigh*

Guess I'll have to rent DVD's now.
Like that Planet Earth that started last night

Which was, by the way, utterly entertaining and enlightening.

'The Edukators’

Not seen that - what is it about, Miranda?
Very late to the party (I see Aunt Edna finishing off the half-drunk glasses of booze and Uncle Ted's asleep in the cat's litter tray) but Cronenberg for 'A History of Violence' and Eric Bana for 'Munich' stand out as snubs to me.

'Crash' won ? Wow. I thought it was excellent and was really moved by it but must admit it was slightly heavy-handed and manipulative (and like everyone else, I guess I expected 'Brokeback Mountain' to run away with Best Picture). However, to those who've said Crash will date quickly due to being a 'message movie', well, I wish I was as optimistic about racism not being an issue in 10 or 20 years time. I think it was saved from just being a message movie by some fantastic performances and a really humane approach to, err, humanity. Sure, the number of coincidental meetings stretched credibility slightly but wasn't one of the points of the film how interconnected we all are ? So, for me, a totally forgiveable flaw.

Not sure which version of '4o Year Old Virgin' I saw. It was pretty racy but I don't remember any total nudity and the most overtly sexual scene (in the shower or should I say with the shower) was masked in bubbles. I thought it had a humanity to it that a lot of comedies lack (and two scenes in particular, the 'You know how I know you're gay' and the 'pointless bulb smashing' really captured something about maleness, in their own small and not very PC way). Surprised me in the same way as American Pie, which seemed like a pure gross-out teen comedy but, IMO, had a little bit more to it.

Oh, and theonetruebix, how did he get his eye that way ? Darren McGavin I mean (hokey as it is, I love The Natural, just a pure feel-good fantasy).
I'm glad someone mentioned Rent. I know the whole thing was a musical, but couldn't they have nominated a song from it as well? And some of the actors definitely could've used a nom.

I actually thought it was pretty cool that "It's Hard Out Here for a Pimp" from Hustle & Flow won out over the songs from Crash and TransAmerica. The performance of the song at the awards was awful, but within the context of the film it works, means something to the characters, you get to see it evolve along with them, and it's performed very well by the actors. Hustle & Flow itself isn't an Oscar-worthy film, but Terrence Howard was an incredible lead. Between that and his role in Crash (and wasn't he in Four Brothers as well last year?) I was kinda hoping he'd win Best Actor as a surprise upset. But then again, it really was Phillip Seymour Hoffman's time.

Brokeback or Crash, I was cool with either of 'em winning Best Pic. Haven't seen the other three yet. Will probably wait for all of them on DVD.
I like message movies. Give me Crash over Chicago, The 40 Year Old Virgin, or any of the American Pie movies any day. I don't like mindless (heartless, soulless) entertainment.

As for "Rent," I had never seen it on stage. I wasn't in love with the movie. I didn't like most of the characters. They seemed petty and self-absorbed. Yeah, i know most of them were dying, but there was very little in any of them to make me feel I could identify with the characters.

[ edited by Nebula1400 on 2006-03-06 15:14 ]
"Kiss Kiss Bang Bang" for best screenplay and Robert Downey Jr for just about every performance he's ever done.

I'm thrilled Phillip Seymour Hoffman won. It's a well-deserved Oscar and not just for this performance.

I liked "Crash" and was pleasantly surprised that it won.
I wish Grizzly Man had won something so we could see Werner Herzog give a speech. (Ja, I didn't show the mauling because it would be disrespectful to the man. . .and to the bears). I loved the penguins but the bears were awesome.

And I thought The Constant Gardner kicked ass. Unlike most of the other serious movies I saw this year, it never had me feeling "wow, this is really, really long." It doesn't have to do with the actual length of the movie, just pacing and editing. And of all the films I saw that tried to upset me about politics (something I like films to do) that one really, really did. I would have said, nom. for best picture, and win for best adaptation screenplay.
I unfortunately haven't seen Crash yet, but I plan on renting it today on. Also:

"Okay, I'm confused. Why were there zombies stumbling around through a post-apocalyptic cityscape during that song from Crash?"

^^thank god I wasn't imagining this--I thought my pink eye was playing tricks with me.

I'm glad Crash won best picture, because I guess now more people will go out and see it. However, I can't help but feel that this is the Academy's way of having a "Oh, shit! Bet you didn't expect that! We are so great!" moment like they did the year Washington and Berry won respectively. I'm not saying that they didn't deserve it--god knows they did--I just can't help but wonder sometimes if decisions are made for the purpose of creating their own memorable events in history of cinema.

And can I say I'm SO glad that pimp song won...oh wait...

I think Revenge of the NOOO! got snubs---and I'm glad it did. Does anyone think Lucas should have saved the money and time by just WRITING the prequels in novel form (or for that case, have someone else who actually knows how to write give that story justice?) It really would have been so much better with HC, the GOD-AWFUL dialouge and oh yeah, those very few CGIed scenes.

What was the topic again??
I'd have to say Johnny Depp in Charlie and the Chocolate factory. While I didn't much like the film itself as it basically left out out Charlie's whole character development. (Charlie did nothing the whole movie!!!, What happened to the flying bubblegum incident??!?) I thought that Johnny was great as Willy Wonka. He really captured the childish insanity of that character it was like watching a Quintin Blake drawing come to life.
Grizzly Man was awful, absolute garbage. It doesn't belong anywhere near the Oscars. However, I would gladly nominate the guy for a Darwin Award.

[ edited by killinj on 2006-03-06 15:30 ]
The guy in Grizzly Man was annoying in many parts of that film, but to be happy that he died is pretty awful. Sure, he was stupid to have been out there with them, he put himself in harm's way and may've been suicidal...but the guy deserves pity more than spite or anything else you can throw at him. He seemed like he needed help. And just when you thought it wasn't really going anywhere beyond the appealing shots of nature and needy foxes, it delved into his background and gave some reasons for why he may've been the way he was. Grizzly Man was a character study of a real person, and one of the most thorough I've ever seen.

He was a nutjob, no question. Those bears in Alaska weren't in the slightest bit of danger, especially compared to bears living elsewhere in the world.
Miranda, "Die fetten Jahre sind vorbei" (The Edukators) opened in Germany in 2004, after being invited to Cannes in May 2004. I don't know when and how widely it was released in the US, but it _does_ seem a bit old.

As for "living in the past", SOPHIE SCHOLL portrays a girl the age of the protagonists of EDUKATORS, but in both films they are struggling with political/social realities. It's just that Scholl's dilemma is so much more interesting than that of the others, _even today_. Anyway -- the questions asked in SOPHIE SCHOLL are timeless; those in EDUKATORS come with a fairly short date of expiry.
There's a lot of posts, which means I didn't bother to read them all so if someone has said this then I'm sorry for repeating it, but Sin City got snubbed.

Mickey Rourke was brilliant in that movie. When he delivers that speech in the bathroom, the one with the line "Blood for blood and by the gallons." I get chills every time I see it.
Grizzly Man was awful, absolute garbage. It doesn't belong anywhere near the Oscars. However, I would gladly nominate the guy for a Darwin Award.

This reminds me a bit of the bad Serenity reviews. Why was it awful, absolute garbage, may I ask?
Sin City probably got snubbed because of the row with the Director's Guild and Rodriguez telling them to eff off and offering co-credit to Frank Miller. A fantastic move on his part that reminds me why I dig him so much.

ETA - some great performances in Sin City, Elijah Wood's still creeps me out...
However, to those who've said Crash will date quickly due to being a 'message movie', well, I wish I was as optimistic about racism not being an issue in 10 or 20 years time.

Oh, a message movie doesn't grow stale because its point is no longer valid -- it grows stale because its so specific in circumstance and setting that once time passes and those circumstances (L.A., late '90s, racial tensions etc.) are in the past, the movie ends up looking preachy and message-y. Do the Right Thing and To Kill a Mockingbird are the only anti-racism films that I can think of right now, off the top of my head, that have really stood the test of time, artistically, even though H'wood has made hundreds of movies that have the socially uplifting message of "racism is bad".

While in the same period, it has made so many more energetic, entertaining and unforgettable romances, musicals, romantic comedies, Westerns, sci-fi epics, film noirs, etc. Hollywood does genre like no other entity in the world, better than any other industry in the world, and yet the awards embrace the serious movies with messages or themes that are really aw-shucks homilies. You list the greatest American directors to ever work, from Ford, Hawks, Welles, Hitchcock and Coppola -- Scorsese, Altman, Spielberg, and their work neatly slots into genres (Westerns, romantic comedies, gangster movies, sci-fi). While the message movies that get made and awarded end up sliding neatly from film history.

I don't know; for me, art is not about the simple exploration of one fairly charged topic that has a definite right/wrong point of view. That'd be awfully like reducing Anna Karenina to the lesson that adultery is wrong. Or Joss making Buffy:tVS all about feminist power to the exclusion of every other dramatic thread.
Crash was about other things, though, dottikin - there's a lot of humanity in it. Of course, the primary message in it is race related.
::hides because she doesn't like D.Fanning::
Sort of Off Topic: The ads and clips I saw from 40-year-old-virgin really turned me off...along with the title, actually. Is that chest waxing scene pretty indicative of the rest of the movie? I ask because I keep hearing (actually reading) that it is a funny movie, but if that is the humor, it is really not for me.

Newcj, I normally hate this kind of movie - I'm just not a Will Ferrell-comedy sorta person, which is what I assumed it was – and practically had to be dragged to the theater. But unexpectedly, I loved it. The chest-waxing scene was probably my least-favorite in the movie, and the only sort of stereotypical gross-out scene of that sort. The reason it worked - for me, at least - was because it cared about its characters, and because Steve Carell endowed his character with such a sweetness that you really cared for/empathized with him. Plus, Catherine Keener is great in everything she's in. It's just a fun comedy - nothing that's going to change the world - but it's one of the first comedies in years that I've actually laughed at and enjoyed.
Though, from reading a couple other comments higher up, it might be good to look for the theatrical version - i haven't seen the unrated one.

And killinj - couldn't disagree more about Grizzly Man! Think what you will about Timothy Treadwell, but to me, the movie itself was brilliant. And took a look at a controversial with subject without judging or preaching, which impressed me. I was left with a sense of Treadwell's stupidity, certainly, and a fascination with what led him to get so out-of-touch with the fact that bears are wild animals, but also pity, and wonder at the animals themselves, and fascination wtih how Treadwell became who he was, and a lot of interesting debates over whether his "research" did more to hurt or harm the animals he was trying to help. A great, complex, well-made film that leads to many fascinating discussions.

[ edited by acp on 2006-03-06 16:26 ]
I decided i'm going to try and see Grizzly Man after I watched Mark Kermode interview Werner Herzog. They were standing somewhere in LA (I think) when someone shot at them with what turned out to be an air-rifle. Well, they and the film crew skedaddled indoors pretty quickly and continued with the interview which carried on as normal until towards the end when Kermode insisted Herzog stand up, take down his trousers to reveal an actual wound in his lower abdomen. He just kept insisting it 'wasn't significant' and I thought there and then if he was willing to do that just for an interview then how far might he go in making his film. Tough bugger.

Yeah, dottikin I agree completely that a film purely made as a message movie won't last (and probably won't be very good to begin with) but to me Crash captures something about people which transcends the 'mere' message that racism is bad and also asks a question that i've wondered about for a long time, namely 'Can you be a racist and still be an otherwise good person or even a hero ?'. Although, as you say, the issue is fairly clear cut, in Crash none of the characters are which is one of the things that I found enjoyable. And there's other stuff in there about personal integrity and the corruption of the individual too.

BTW, I personally would add 'In the Heat of the Night' and 'The Defiant Ones' as anti-racism movies that have lasted (tho' neither of these are just about racism) and I completely agree with your frustration over the snubbing of genre films at the Oscars (excluding sops like John Wayne's for True Grit, more of an 'Oops, he's still not dead and has a great body of work plus we totally should have given him one for The Searchers' award).

And no offence to Dakota Fanning but yep, i'm in the slightly creepy camp. Lots of her co-stars have said things like 'She's a 40 year old woman in the body of a ten year old' but none of them have followed that up with 'Which, y'know, is weird and kind of scary'.
Charlie did nothing the whole movie!!!, What happened to the flying bubblegum incident??!?


Tim Burton had mentioned that they were trying to stick to the book as much as possible (besides the exploration into Willys past) and that scene was never in the book, it took away the integrity of Charlie and his Grandfather.

p.s We call Dakota the the anti christ at home, altho I so loved her in I am Sam.
Is there a Best Children's Movie? I'd vote for 'Sky High' -takes high school anxiety to super hero levels.
I like message movies. Give me Crash over Chicago, The 40 Year Old Virgin, or any of the American Pie movies any day. I don't like mindless (heartless, soulless) entertainment.

I don't know about 40 Year Old Virgin or the American Pie movies because I have not seen them since the clips make them seem like their brand of humor would be painful for me to watch. However, "Chicago" is a pretty scathing satirical indictment of our celebrity-focused society and everyone who promotes or makes money off from it. It just does it with songs and dances. The fact that it is based on a true story of real people, just makes it that much scarier. Structurally, it also was the culmination of what Bob Fosse tried to do in "All that Jazz" and to a lesser degree in “Cabaret.” Don’t let the glitz distract you from what is really going on any more than you would let the demons and vampires distract you in BtVS.
How about Mickey Rourke in Sin City? I also think Christian Bale did an award-worthy job finally portraying Bruce Wayne the way he should be. And...lest we forget Summer Glau.
Why was it awful, absolute garbage, may I ask?

I walked out the theatre feeling like I'd just seem a film that exploited a man who was likely mentally ill as a promotional tool for a dubious organization. I don't know how best to express it, but something about how the film was presented seemed off. Also, I don't think it presented both sides well. I would've like more information from an actual biologists or conservationists point of view.
"which means I didn't bother to read them all"

Well, war_machine, perhaps in future you can make an effort. Just a bit of courtesy towards your fellow posters here, ok?
I like message movies. Give me Crash over Chicago, The 40 Year Old Virgin, or any of the American Pie movies any day. I don't like mindless (heartless, soulless) entertainment.

I have to quibble with anything that equates "message movies" with serious filmmaking, and non-message films with heartless, soulless entertainment.

To me, the term "message movie" implies a film that has gotten so caught up in its own seriousness and the importance of the message it is imparting that it has forgotten how to tell a good story, and risks being pedantic. John Sayles would be an example to me of an excellent filmmaker who somewhere along the way (after Lone Star, and Matewan, and a few others that I adored) forgot that filmmaking was ultimately about the story, and started to make it all about the message.

I say all this as someone whose movie tastes tend toward the serious and the foreign/independendent. But I would never be dismissive of films which are simply (or not so simply) entertaining, as well. Newcj provided an excellent example with Chicago. And I would say that 40-year-old Virgin is far from a soulless comedy (pure entertainment, sure, but entertainment can have heart).

I fall in the middle in how I feel about Crash. I enjoyed it a lot when I saw it, and found it really stuck with me for a while. On the other hand, I did feel it had a lot of flaws, mostly in that "message movie" territory – it laid things on with such a heavy hand, for one, and instead of allowing its characters to be real people, instead gave them all two opposing faces (hero/racist, etc) without much subtlety or gray area in between. Again, not to say I didn't like it - i thought it was a thoughtful and well-made movie. But best picture? no. And I agree with those who think it won't stand the test of time.

To me, the films that really weather well are the ones that illuminate our human condition, rather than try hard to deliver a certain message. That can be through drama, romance, satire, western, epic, whatever - the form is less important than the story and the characters. And hopefully, in the process, they entertain us, make us think, and tell a good story.
Mickey Rourke completely stole "Sin City." He really deserved some form of accolades.

There are just so many great-to-amazing films that come out each year and are rarely given a mention during awards season. Or, in the case of "Brokeback Mountain," have made SUCH an impact throughout the year, that by the Academy Awards in Feb/Mar, everyone is so sick of it that they'll give the big award trophies to the dark horses. Examples: Roman Polanski and Adrien Brody for "The Pianist," "Shakespeare in Love," and all those others I can't think of off hand right now.

Anyone else cringe at the truthiness of Jon Stewart saying "For those of you keeping score at home, Martin Scorsese: no oscars, 36 Mafia, one oscar." ?

Hurts.

[ edited by TheZeppo on 2006-03-06 17:18 ]
I walked out the theatre feeling like I'd just seem a film that exploited a man who was likely mentally ill as a promotional tool for a dubious organization.

Well, everyone reacts differently, I suppose. Though I'm not sure we saw (or at least perceived) the same movie. What was the dubious organization it was promoting? I've rarely seen a documentary that seemed to have less of a side to take, or cause to promote, or even definite point of view - other than curiosity and wanting to discover more - on the part of the filmmaker. I was so impressed at how nonjudgmental and evenhanded Herzog remained. He certainly wasn't shilling for or promoting Treadwell's organization, which I thought came off rather badly. And I guess you could argue that he exploited Treadwell and his story, though I felt like he did it with such pity and warmth and without condemnation (but without lionizing or making him and hero, and still exploring why someone would enter into such lunacy) that I was OK with it.

Interesting to see how we all perceive things differently, though....
YES!!!!
Sin City was totally snubbed.
Just adding my $.02 on Joss's topic:

I know he won for LOTR last year, but King Kong was a wonderful movie where you genuninely felt the relationship between Anne and Kong -- and not in a creepy way. It would have been nice to see it get a nod.

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory not up for Art Direction!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!? I still don't get that. I mean, hello???? It also should have been up for makeup.

I saw only three of the best pic nominees, but was happy that Crash won. Someone else commented on how they use it in their classes. Me too. It's a powerful film. As was Capote. In fact I found Capote so disturbing on so many levels that you leave the theatre feeling a bit icky. That's a film that really gets inside its subject warts and all.

And finally, although Were Rabbit was most deserving, I do wish Tim Burton had won for the lovely, lyrical Corpse Bride. And Danny Elfman needed a score/song nomination.
HITCHHIKER'S GUIDE -- Best Adapted Screenplay

This not happening is not a snub, it's wisdom.
I can't agree with Miss Edith about King Kong. I thought it was overblown and over rated and really needed a good editing. Yes, the scenes with Kong and Anne were (mostly) well done but the dinosaurs fights did nothing to advance the plot and went on for far too long.
And the CGI in some places was rather clunky. I can get pulled into a story pretty easily and forget that what I am seeing is acting and various effects but King Kong kept throwing me out.
Actually Miss Edith, last year was the first in three years that Peter Jackson DIDN'T win best director. Last year it went to Clint Eastwood.
I would have loved to see Judd Apatow get a Best Original Screenplay nom for The 40-Year-Old Virgin. David Cronenberg deserved more love too.

Crash winning is incomprehensible to me. Again the Oscars prove just how ridiculously out of touch they can be.
Quite right, MySerenity. That occurred to me after I typed it. I tend to forget M$B as I really disliked that film.

Edited to add: Do note that PJ didn't WIN best director for three years, he only got nominated.

[ edited by Miss Edith on 2006-03-06 17:54 ]
He certainly wasn't shilling for or promoting Treadwell's organization, which I thought came off rather badly.

Yes, it did come off badly to me too. Although, I don't think the people from his organization realize it. They came off as a bit naive whose naiveté was being taken advantage of to suit the purposes of the filmmaker. Although, not so naive as to not gain from it. After all, they get money out of the deal.
bschnell wrote

As for "living in the past", SOPHIE SCHOLL portrays a girl the age of the protagonists of EDUKATORS, but in both films they are struggling with political/social realities. It's just that Scholl's dilemma is so much more interesting than that of the others, _even today_. Anyway -- the questions asked in SOPHIE SCHOLL are timeless; those in EDUKATORS come with a fairly short date of expiry.


Wow. We couldn’t possibly be further apart in our opinion if we tried, but obviously I respect that you have a different take on this.

I can understand why people go for the Sophie Scholl type of film, after all heroic resistance to the death in the face of rampant dictatorship based on a true story, how can you not be moved. I also have nothing but respect for the Scholls, what they did was immensely important (not in practical terms, because quite frankly it made no difference at all) but in historical terms – at least someone stood up in the face of evil.

What made me cry watching the Edukators though is exactly the opposite, the much more mundane and ubiquitous spectacle how youthful enthusiasm trying to make things better, to create more social justice, crumbles over time while we are running around trying to cope with everyday life, hold down a job and pay the mortgage.

When the hell did we stop breaking the system and became the system? How much are we going to let it take over our lives? Exactly what Angel season 5 was talking about. There is nothing irrelevant or short-term about this. And if you think we are even close to a socially just society anywhere in the world, well I also have to politely disagree with you. Anyhow, I have a feeling I am possibly a bit older than you, so this may well be reflected in our respective choices (which are both equally valid). The Edukators made me feel sad, I don’t know were all that political anger I had earlier in life went.

gossi – if you are interested in the movie, check out the relevant page on the IMBd here, it just explains it better than I could.
Naomi Watts for King Kong. She was absolutely amazing, particularly impressive since the "leading man" she had such great chemistry with didn't even exist.
OK, I'll weigh in here as one who clapped when CRASH won. Was it a bit anvilicious? Yep, it was. But it was necessary. Anytime a movie makes me cringe, and makes me feel uncomfortable? That's a signal that it's probably a good film. Contrast this with the Constant Gardener, which also had cringe-worthy segments, but they were all "over there." They were all in settings in which we could imagine ourselve doing much better. Not so Crash.
instead of allowing its characters to be real people, instead gave them all two opposing faces (hero/racist, etc) without much subtlety or gray area in between


acp, To me, that was saying that at any one instant everyone has it in them to be either the hero or the villain depending on circumstances ranging from an entire upbringing through to a single wrong word said at an inopportune time. Meaning that everything is gray all the time and no-one is completely one thing ot the other. I agree that a film that captures some general truth about the human condition is more likely to last, I just think Crash does this (it still may not last tho' personally I think this may be more because multiple viewings could leave folk feeling more manipulated than the first emotive watching does). We may have to agree to disagree on this one ;).

I also agree that non-message movies can offer a lot, in fact, i'd go as far as saying that all good movies have some message or other if you look hard enough (or I just over-analyse everything, maybe I should do an essay on over-analysis ;) even if it's as simple as tolerance for others, no matter how little sex they've had ;).
Anytime a movie makes me cringe, and makes me feel uncomfortable? That's a signal that it's probably a good film.

By that logic, the best movies must be the gross-out comedies! :~P
Pretty sure all of these have already been mentioned, but I'll add to the swollen chorus:

Shane Black for the Kiss Kiss Bang Bang screenplay (I think it would belong in the adapted category).

Eric Bana for Munich.

Grizzly Man for Documentary Feature.

Clifton Collins Jr. for Best Supporting Actor in Capote.
Cillian Murphy for "Breakfast on Pluto". I also think "Walk the Line" should have been nominated for Best Picture in place of "Crash," which I felt was heavy-handed and overwrought, for the most part.
John Sayles would be an example to me of an excellent filmmaker who somewhere along the way (after Lone Star, and Matewan, and a few others that I adored) forgot that filmmaking was ultimately about the story, and started to make it all about the message.

I love John Sayles movies! His movies are essentially guaranteed to be excellent, and not mind-numbing BS.

However, "Chicago" is a pretty scathing satirical indictment of our celebrity-focused society and everyone who promotes or makes money off from it.

I got that. I just didn't think the message was that important, because it doesn't apply to the average person. "Crash" on the other hand, does. I think that to some extent, Crash isn't liked by more people, because they are threatened by the topic. It does apply to them, but they don't want to acknowledge it. Most people don't want to think of themselves as racist, and this movie challenges them/us to think again.
Crash works better when you view it as Dickensian. At least for me, thinking of it in those terms made me appreciate it a lot more.
Also, the structure of "Crash," it's intertwining, interconnected plots and characters, is the way it is, because it's a parable. And that's probably the best way to view it, or yes, you will feel manipulated by events that seem too convenient.

I haven't seen the other BP nominees, but I just loved everything about the movie. The look of it, the way it was shot, the performances/characters, the sharp, sometimes very funny dialogue...and yeah, it did make me think about its message, but it also really moved me too.

[ edited by pat32082 on 2006-03-06 18:43 ]
I read an article about Paradise Now and that petition that Arabchick was talking about. Apparently, the petition was not about calling the film's country of origin by a specific name but about the content of the film.

The petition was apparently started by the father of one of the kids that got killed in the suicide bombing portrayed in the film. It was kind of a gut wrenching article talking about how the movie does a "white out" at the film's end, when we are supposed to assume the bomber has blown himself up, rather than show the horrific aftermath with body parts and blood, etc. (I imagine it would not have gotten the movie makers point across if they did, duh.) The petition was apparently saying that the movie glorifies terrorism because of this ending.

I personally applaud anyone that makes an indie film, especially about political topics. Further, I think you can make a movie about ANYTHING you want because that's the beauty of film making! I thought it would be a good idea to share what I heard about this considering it is not represented here in the thread and some might be interested. Yay free speech!

...and now back to your regularly scheduled, non-political film discussion...
Also, the structure of "Crash," it's intertwining, interconnected plots and characters, is the way it is, because it's a parable. And that's probably the best way to view it, or yes, you will feel manipulated by events that seem too convenient.

I agree 100 percent, pat32082. That's actually how I made my peace with a few of the things that seemed extra heavy-handed/coincidental with the movie - that it wasn't striving for realism, per se (after all, the coincidences alone would stretch any imagination) but for allegory. And as an allegory I really did love the movie and, as I said, it stuck with me.
But I still, ultimately, feel it got a little too heavy-handed and manipulative. And by this I don't meant that the topic was too threatening, or struck too close to home, but that it went with the obvious in everything, and showed only the extremes of characters. To me it was a highly middle-brow examination of racism. Which doesn't make me immune from feeling powerfully affected by it, but has made it ring a little more hollow on subsequent viewings. And left me feeling just a tad disappointed that it won best picture, since I don't think it will age well. Still, I think it's an excellent film that's far better than many previous best-picture winners we've had!
Syriana deserved more Oscar love than it got, though Clooney definintely deserved his Oscar.....
Hardly saw any of last year's movies (haven't even seen Kong yet) and can't think of one that impressed me as much as Serenity, but, with that out of the way I'd have to say I did enjoy The 40 Year Old Virgin, don't think there was anything particularly Oscar-worthy about it, but I do reckon Steve Carrell is going to become huge over the next year or so.
If only Reefer Madness: The Movie Musical had been released in theatres.

Costume design
Art direction
Picture
Director
Adapted Screenplay
Score
Original Song: (take your pick, mine'd be "Tell 'Em The Truth")
Supp. Actor: John Kassir
Actress: Kristen Bell
Supp. Actress: Amy Spanger
Cinematography

Definitely one of my favorites of the year.
It's not the convergence of events in Crash that leave me feeling a tad manipulated (in fact, i'm a complete sucker for what I see as two of the most powerful ideas in fiction, the convergence of fate and the hero with the power to change it) it's the actual mechanics of the movie (e.g. swelling music, slow motion etc.) that are sometimes a little obvious. But you're right pat32082 it's maybe better seen as a somewhat larger than life parable.

Take 'The Natural' (on my mind since it was mentioned above). As a sports movie it's ridiculously over-blown and pretentious. As a fantasy retelling of Arthurian legend it's perfectly fine since in fantasy you already accept that anything's possible so when Roy Hobbs makes his own lightning at the end it feels fantastical but fitting (and well, OK, maybe a little bit hokey ;).

Worrying about the convergence of events in Crash is, to me, like saying 'Why did Vincent and Joules end up in the cafe during the robbery ? Talk about convenient'. That's just part of the plot. Relevant tho' it is, Crash isn't meant to be a kitchen sink drama, it's not meant to be realistic, it's meant to be real (and for my money, it is).
I love John Sayles movies! His movies are essentially guaranteed to be excellent, and not mind-numbing BS.

There was a time I would have agreed with that, and I still count Lone Star as one of my favorite movies ever. And loved many others of his as well. But with Casa de los Babys and Silver City he's descended into preachy pedantry, and that makes me sad - he used to know the value of a good story and good characters, rather than force his opinions into the mouths of his characters whether or not they fit.

I still hold out hope he'll return to form, though, and will keep going to see his films.
I'm glad "The Upside of Anger" is mentioned, it is my favorite Costner performance. The film's not too shabby either. Don't forget Joan Allen, she was totally wonderful in it, if not better than Costner. Chiwetel needs his own catagory! I just recently saw "Dirty Pretty Things", and he blew me away. I love the look of "Good Night and Good Luck" (and I thought was a better film than "Crash" which I do like).
New category: Best Performance by Chiwetel Ejiofor.

I thought Good Night and Good Luck was better than Crash as well, and it is also a "message" movie. I just knew in my heart it would never win. The Constant Gardener was my second choice, but it wasn't nominated in the Best Picture category.

[ edited by Nebula1400 on 2006-03-06 19:35 ]
Woody Allen (my favorite filmmaker, period) should have been nominated for writing Melinda and Melinda rather than Match Point which was the only Woody film that I wasn't fond of.

[ edited by TheZeppo on 2006-03-06 19:51 ]
>>HITCHHIKER'S GUIDE -- Best Adapted Screenplay
This not happening is not a snub, it's wisdom.<<

Debatable. *s*
Jake Gyllenhaal - I think he has done some great work this year and deserves to be recognised for it
Maybe if Terrence Howard had been nominated as best supporting actor for Crash he would have had a better chance? It's the only best picture nominated movie I saw. I thought he was amazing as the together guy who loses it. In terms of the film's improbabilities, I can tell you that the part where one undercover cop shoots another one dead after a traffic altercation really happened, though details were fictionalized to fit it into the story.
Wow, this time I was so late to the party that I missed it altogether! What an interesting thread, and the Oscars would have been so much more tolerable had I watched it with you guys.

Re: Chiwetel. I haven't seen his other films, yet, but the clips I have seen would make me agree that he is indeed deserving of his own category.

Re: Jon Stewart. I wanted Jon Stewart to be a little more "on," as I think he is tremendously funny. I agree that he was better with the apparently unscripted comments than the scripted ones. (Did anyone catch the nasty comment about the Baldwins, though? I mean, I happen to agree with it, but the audience had an audible gasp.)

Re: Tony Curtis. I heard about his comment yesterday, and I really was taken aback -- particularly since he agreed to do the reconstruction of the omitted scene from Spartacus with Hopkins. I assume the voting had already been concluded by the time he made his comment, but I found the sentiments unnerving. And with respect to the fact that the voters don't always watch all the films -- doesn't this underscore why there is such a push by the studios to get as much publicity as they can at voting time? And why films that opened early in the year tend to get snubbed? Although in this case, all the publicity for Brokeback Mountain may have had the opposite effect because of the gay cowboy issue. (And, as most of the montages in the Oscars telecast were nothing more than snooze-worthy, the cowboy montage stood out as the most interesting. And how many academic papers have been written on the gay subtext in westerns?)

Of the five nominated films, I have only seen GNGL to date. I didn't think Clooney had a ghost of a chance to win in any of the categories for which he was nominated. He's an entertaining actor, but I've never really thought he was deserving of an acting Oscar. But he's had a very good year, and I think so many people wanted to give him something. I like his willingness to take a political stance -- and I liked his acceptance speech above all others. But the lefty in me was just happy to have movies recognized for trying to deal with contemporary political messes, even if they were dressed up as period pieces. After seeing several artists locked up this year for being suspected "terrorists" just because their art was politically controversial, I'm happy to see some filmmakers making an attempt.

And as for the original topic of this thread -- I've seen so few films this year that I cannot contribute. But I must admit that I yelled at the TV during the screenplay awards that there was a certain JW who should have been nominated.

I can understand why people go for the Sophie Scholl type of film, after all heroic resistance to the death in the face of rampant dictatorship based on a true story, how can you not be moved. I also have nothing but respect for the Scholls, what they did was immensely important (not in practical terms, because quite frankly it made no difference at all) but in historical terms – at least someone stood up in the face of evil.

What made me cry watching the Edukators though is exactly the opposite, the much more mundane and ubiquitous spectacle how youthful enthusiasm trying to make things better, to create more social justice, crumbles over time while we are running around trying to cope with everyday life, hold down a job and pay the mortgage.

When the hell did we stop breaking the system and became the system?


Well ... there's an awful lot of "we" here that I can't relate to (just like the one in "we" started WWII -- I'm forty-one; I really didn't). Maybe to someone who lives like that, EDUKATORS is indeed the more moving film.

I don't live like that. I do have a mortgage, a car that needs to be financed, but they are means to an end, nothing more. My job's not something I hold down, it's a huge and satisfying part of my life. So, yeah, maybe I'm spoiled, and certainly I'm blessed ... but a story with a universal theme fascinates me more than one that wonders where suburbia went wrong. Five years from now, I doubt that anyone will remember DIE FETTEN JAHRE. I'm not sure if SOPHIE SCHOLL has the makings of a true classic, but its theme will continue to be discussed.
Well, there's always the ever-popular Spielberg snub. Since I haven't seen Munich, I don't know if it was deserved or not. From several remarks here, it seems as though it was well-received, though.
This has probably been said (tried to read all posts, might've missed it) but the fact that JOAN ALLEN didn't get nominated for Upside Of Anger is just plain stupid.

Also, THE ARISOTCRATS--Best Documentary. OK, maybe not, but damn it's funny.

[ edited by VerseRoamer on 2006-03-06 20:39 ]
However, "Chicago" is a pretty scathing satirical indictment of our celebrity-focused society and everyone who promotes or makes money off from it.

I got that. I just didn't think the message was that important, because it doesn't apply to the average person.


Nebula1400 Here we are going to have to agree to disagree on a couple points.

First, calling something “mindless (heartless, soulless)”)that has something to say about society and the human beings that make it up but has a message you do not value, seems a bit harsh and inaccurate.

Second, the cult of celebrity, IMO, affects everyone in this society. It is not as in-your-face obviously harmful as racism, but it is an integral part of our society and probably human nature to some extent. “Chicago” is not only about the people who are overtly in the business of celebrity, it is also how it affects the people raised in a society that worships celebrity. It is not a pretty picture if you look closely.

Off-hand examples: How often has Paris Hilton been mentioned on Whedonesque (of all places) in just the last few weeks? Admittedly, it is usually in a less than positive way, but that is because she is such a good example of the phenomenon. There were little girls dressed up like her and her sister for Halloween at my son’s grade school. This is the role-model they are seeing. As sad as that makes me, it is still better than what some people are told it takes to become loved by the particular society they value.

People have been murdering other people in order to become a celebrity of one degree or another throughout history. John Lennon and on a larger scale an awful lot of victims of terrorists are proof that it is still happening. (What is a martyr but a religious celebrity?)

IMO “Chicago” manages to combine a picture of the insanity of our society willing to make someone a celebrity for something that should not bec elebrated, (In their cases having murdered a person.) while also showing how the lure of celebrity can shape that person, and by extension any other person. It just does it through the stories of two women and the people they interact with who all sing and dance.

There are various posters who have said that they cannot relate to a message unless it is reflective of their life in very specific ways. Most of the themes mentioned, however, are all around us whether the specific story happened in the past, future or across an ocean. In those cases, the movies my be more about understanding the people and the world all around you rather than your life right at the moment but that might make them more valuable in the long run.
I like movies with a message, but I'm surprised Escapism movies weren't a bigger winner. It seems like many of the heavy movies with Big Causes won. We're in the middle of what seems like an endless, pointless war, racking up incredible budget deficits, we've had our dirty laundry aired to the world in New Orleans ...

I don't know movie history much, but don't we need a pretty musical, of the sort they had in the Depression era? Fred and Ginger, take me away from this.
I liked Crash and I kept thinking about it for awhile after I saw it. It WAS heavy handed but on this topic - I just don't mind. I really believe, that in the US - we just love to pretend racism isn't such a big deal and I think that Haggis illustrated beautifully how it IS a big deal.
I loved Brokeback too but what impressed me the most about that film was the sheer beauty of it. I was awash in how gorgeous it all was. I read the story before I saw the movie - so emotionally I knew what to expect. It was the visuals that blew me away though. And of course the acting was spectacular.
I look forward to seeing the others that I missed - GNGL, Syriana, Sophie Scholl, Grizzly Man, Capote and Constant Gardner. King Kong suprised me - I really enjoyed it alot. Although I did not enjoy seeing how frightened a few of the younger kids got at the theater! Come on parents - use your noggin - a four year old would be terrified by that movie!
Also - palehorse - may I recommend Chiwetal Ejiofor in Dirty Pretty Things? His performance made me weep. He is an incredible actor with a huge range in his repetoire. I can't wait to see Kinky Boots.
Did anyone catch the nasty comment about the Baldwins, though?


Yeah, I believe it was "Our next pair of presenters could be described as a pair of talented brothers, which is also another way to describe the Baldwin family." Zing!
Well, considering that i've seen exactly none of the films you guys are discussing (with the exception of Serenity, obviously) i'm going to find it hard to offer an opinion on the whole "who got snubbed" topic. The last film i saw at the cinema prior to Serenity was X-Men 2 so it's been a while as you might guess.

I'm just not a movie kinda person. I like television series with ongoing plots and evolving characters, things movies don't offer me. Unless a movie happens to have a connection to a television series (Serenity, X Files, etc) or a comic book or novel that i enjoy (X-Men, Spider-Man, Lord of the Rings and so on) then it's doubtful i'll see it until it hits television, and even then only when it's on a channel where i don't have to pay. No way that i'll ever be getting the Sky Movies package considering how little i care about watching films.

Except Die Hard, of course, but that should go without saying! ;)
Well, there's always the ever-popular Spielberg snub

Spielberg wasn't exactly snubbed - he did get a best-director nomination, after all, and Munich got a best-picture nom. I really did think Munich was one of the very best films of the year - I would have been more than happy to see either it or Capote or Brokeback win best picture – but I think Ang Lee deserved the best directing win more this year, especially given the tremendous versatility he's shown in all his movies in the past, and the grace with which he directed this demanding film. While Spielberg is a master, and did a fantastic job with Munich, there were parts (the pacing in the middle, for instance) that showed it not to be among his absolute best directing jobs.
Munich came out at exactly the right time, and often with the Academy, timing is everything. It's an extremely well-made film, but it's a bit meandering narratively and could have done with more than a few edits and rewrites. Spielberg has made better, more important and entertaining films in the past and has been cited for most of them. One of his best, in my opinion, is Catch Me If You Can and his best will always be Jaws.

I honestly believe that if Munich had come out in the summer, it would have been forgotten come Oscar time.
Before this runs off the page, let me just say there's a place where you all can have sustained conversations about movies, other tv-shows, books, comics, etc... and that's whedonesque.org. You're all very welcome there.
"Sin City" for Adapted Screenplay and either Mickey Rourke (Marv), Elijah Wood (Kevin), or Bruce Willis (Hartigan) for Best Actor in an Supporting Role.

Also, Mirrormask got snubbed, horifically, and at least merited some technical nominations.
I thought Stewart did an above average, if not very good job. He had to tone it down somewhat for the setting, but he still managed to display enthusiasm and be entertaining throughout the night. The political ad satires and the cowboy western montages were brilliant.
and that's whedonesque.org


... which is a message board ;P
One more thing. The whole topic here is snubbed movies. I wanted Felicity Huffman to win for Transamerica, and Duncan Tucker to nominated for best original screenplay. I can't say enough good things about that movie. I got to see it at a film festival and the director was there and I just loved it. He did SO much with so little and the end product is a story that I will keep enjoying on DVD. It's a movie with a message for sure - and suprisingly that message is about community, family, love, trust and all sorts of good things.
I think (again this is just MY opinion)- if you really want to talk about outsiders - transgendered people would be at the top of the list. And Felicity's character - Bree was not very pretty on top of that. I can't remember if Daniel Day Lewis won for My Left Foot but I think winners in the best actor/actress category are usually very good looking as they play their roles.
ruthless1, Daniel Day did win for My Left Foot.
Good Night and Good Luck was sort of at the apex of this year's movie and the entire move toward socially relevant films. We're in a time when the news media is in full toady mode, afraid of challenging the current administration and the multinational corporations that pull its strings. Good Night and Good Luck was a pointed criticism of the (designed) failure of prominent (and not-so-prominent) journalists and media runners to put ethics over careers and profits, and to report the news that has relevance to the public. People are killing and dying in a war waged on lies; consumers are being screwed right, left, from behind and above by transnational corporations, and they rarely even know about it; hate crimes are at an all-time high; and the list continues. I think the movies being honored this year are a defiant response to the effort to sedate the public into apathetic bliss.

There's so much more I want to say about this, but I have to take my son to his guitar lesson and then go to work (where I will be showing "North Country" to my class).

and that's whedonesque.org

... which is a message board ;P


It's a blog, sweetie. ;-)
Thanks zeppo - I couldn't find it quick enough.
The people who created the software it runs on swear its a message board :) Now, whedonesque.com on the other hand... ;P

ETA: Wait, Ben is Glory?!
Yeah, I believe it was "Our next pair of presenters could be described as a pair of talented brothers, which is also another way to describe the Baldwin family." Zing!

Can it still be considered nasty if it's true? Then the question is...which two brothers...or are they all half talented?
Brokeback Mountain was REALLY my favorite, hype aside.
I think Crash is waaay overrated. That's not fair.
But well, in a few years nobody will remember Crash, but Brokeback Mountain.
Is this a record for number of comments?
Fun to find have such a diverse, informed, intelligent, humorous, and interesting bunch of comments on current films, especially since it's a topic that really isn't what this blog is about (albeit one introduced by Joss).

I think the movies being honored this year are a defiant response to the effort to sedate the public into apathetic bliss.

I agree that this is one of the best bunch of nominations in years, Nebula1400 - one of the few times I actually like most of the films and performances nominated! Every so often the Academy makes good pics. Despite the snubs I mentioned earlier.

(edited to fix spelling typo.... My inner proofreader insisted :-) )

[ edited by acp on 2006-03-06 21:06 ]
At least 50 more for that, acp :) I think... hmm.. too lazy to look ;)
Then, since we are being politely invited by Caroline to decamp over to Whedonesque.org, may I perhaps offer up this thought?
Joss, you did your best to distract us from the fact that we were gypped. YOU were gypped. No matter how many other worthy films were snubbed, yours tops my list.
We was robbed!
I can't forget Serenity, it should have gotten best picture or director or something! Seriously, it would have been nice to at least get a best visual effects nod.

Only three songs for Best Original Song? As someone else said, what about Danny Elfman's "Remains of Day" from Corpse Bride, or any of the songs he wrote for Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. Elfman certainly deserved some love this year.

I thought Heath Ledger was a revelation in both Brokeback Mountain and, strangely enough, The Brothers Grimm. His performance was one of the best things about that movie.

Sin City! Best editing, best cinematography, best visual effects...come one, how could they leave this one out?!
re: Lioness' WE WERE ROBBED!

When the head of the Academy came out talking about the power of stories I ad-libbed an additional paragraph on how the Academy will always reward the power of great stories well told, so long a they don't take place on spaceships.
"...but I think Ang Lee deserved the best directing win more this year, especially given the tremendous versatility he's shown in all his movies in the past, and the grace with which he directed this demanding film."

Agreed. My date and I clinked glasses when he was announced as winner. And you put it exactly how I would have. Versatility, indeed. Sometimes I think Lee borders on savant behaviour with his innate ability to defy any stereotypical niche that anyone might try to fit him into. He's crazy skilled, that man. I respect him tremendously.

I brought up Spielberg only because, you know... didn't win.
Youse don't have to decamp just yet, the entry still sits quite high up on the frontpage. But if you want to, it's there.
I thought Heath Ledger was a revelation in both Brokeback Mountain and, strangely enough, The Brothers Grimm. His performance was one of the best things about that movie.

Talk about damning with faint praise...
and that's whedonesque.org

... which is a message board ;P

It's a blog, sweetie. ;-)


The .org isn't a blog, it's a board. The .com is a blog.
When the head of the Academy came out talking about the power of stories I ad-libbed an additional paragraph on how the Academy will always reward the power of great stories well told, so long a they don't take place on spaceships.

I was right there with you in my thinking, z.

or are they all half talented

That would be my critical assessment.

Although I have not seen Brokeback Mtn, I would have to agree that Ang Lee deserved the Oscar recognition, as much for his past work as for this film. As George Clooney said in the backstage talk with the press after the show was over, three of the directors nominated were essentially first-time directors. Presumably, they will have other opportunities. And Spielberg is already an icon. His luster isn't going to diminish because he didn't win (remember in those pre-Schindler's List days when people complained because he couldn't get a nomination at all?). Ang Lee deserved his win.

Actually, despite the Boss's topic, I think this year's awards were remarkably sane. In years past, people were snubbed in favor of people who never should have been nominated in the first place. I don't think any of the nominees in the major categories were totally inappropriate. Despite box office returns, this year was pretty good for movies -- both for those with more discriminating tastes (and I am not talking Tony Curtis here) and for those who appreciate the mainstream pablum -- and not all who deserved recognition could be honored with the top awards.
>Well, there's always the ever-popular Spielberg snub.

You know, I went to see Munich at Christmas when I went home to Chicago precisely becuase it was being talked up as an Oscar favorite, and frankly....."Ennngh" was my reaction. I loved Geoffrey Rush (it took me forever to convince myself that that was even him!) but I never really cared about any of the characters as people. They were story tools -- far more than the folks in Crash IMO. And part of the way through I was bored.

I agree with the guy who mentioned Catch Me if You Can as one of his best. I still think Schindler's List is one of the best of all time and that Ralph Fiennes was robbed by Tommy Lee Jones that year. But that's the nature of the beast, isn't it?
Ang Lee is brilliant, and I love how so many of his films explore the theme of the pain of repressing your emotions. Crouching Tiger, The Ice Storm, The Hulk, and certainly Brokeback all explore this in varying ways, and all are successful.

I personally think the Academy has always awarded overwrought melodrama over devastating subtlety. Thus, the Crash win.
Without a doubt, the BIGGEST snub in the history of the Oscars was Sin City. How the hell could that masterpiece of a movie not win a single award much less not even be nominated for one!

It should have one Best Picture I tell ya! BEST EFFING PICTURE!

"George Bush hates movies in black and white."

That's the only explanation I can think of for this travesty. This will go down in history as one of the biggest snubs ever in the history of awards shows next to Buffy's Once More, With Feeling.

And Joss, the only way you would have ever won an Oscar last night was if you made Mal and Simon gay and have a naked sex scene with one another. Apparently that's the minumum requirement nowadays just to even be nominated!

...

What would a naked gay sex scene between Mal and Simon look like anyway? Just curious...
What would a naked gay sex scene between Mal and Simon look like anyway? Just curious...

It's my mission to show that scene during the Superbowl one year.

Sin City couldn't be nominated, I believe - the director stuck two fingers up at the right people due to some kind of disbute. And good on him.
The .org isn't a blog, it's a board. The .com is a blog.

Can. Worms. Everywhere.
That woud be the aforementioned dispute wherein Rodriguez wanted to give co-directing credit to Frank Miller and the DGA (Director's Guild of America) would not allow it. Rodriguez responded by quitting the DGA.
And no offence to Dakota Fanning but yep, i'm in the slightly creepy camp. Lots of her co-stars have said things like 'She's a 40 year old woman in the body of a ten year old' but none of them have followed that up with 'Which, y'know, is weird and kind of scary'.

{snip}
Anyone else cringe at the truthiness of Jon Stewart saying "For those of you keeping score at home, Martin Scorsese: no oscars, 36 Mafia, one oscar." ?

Hurts.

{snip}
People are killing and dying in a war waged on lies; consumers are being screwed right, left, from behind and above by transnational corporations, and they rarely even know about it; hate crimes are at an all-time high; and the list continues. I think the movies being honored this year are a defiant response to the effort to sedate the public into apathetic bliss.


Word, y'all.

I agree with all the Ang Lee love, but Hulk? Er, not so much. I mean, there was a standard poodle who Hulks-out in it. Standard. Poodle. And Nick Nolte, looking like one of his mug shots, with acting to match. *shudders* But apart from that, I totally agree Mr. Lee has awesome, awesome directing skills, from The Wedding Banquet to Ice Storm to Crouching Tiger to Brokeback. Although the story of Brokeback had some emptiness to it (like Nebula 1400, I agree that there was something missing from the "first act" that made everything that followed a little less easy to believe), the acting, cinematography, editing, etc., all came together to make as much as possible out of the story, which is a tribute to the director.
*Bad Kitty runs huffing and puffing back in from a heavy gym workout to quickly add.. (before the discussion is swept from the board..)*

Matt Dillon! I forgot about Matt Dillon! No, no not 'Crash'. He was fine in that. I'm talking about his turn as Charles Bukowski in 'Factotum' (a film which, it is quite possible, nobody but me and my shadow saw). Easily a career-best performance from him, in my opinion. If he was going to be nominated for an award it should have been for that performance. (Plus, the library-monitor in me would've LOVED to have seen the Oscar race for Best Actor between Truman Capote and Charles Bukowski...)
What would a naked gay sex scene between Mal and Simon look like anyway? Just curious...

Spoiler Alert! (or slashfic alert!) ;-)

Simon: I wish I knew how to quit you.

Mal: Shiny! We'll be in Wyoming in an hour's time...you can pick up your earnings and be on your merry. Meantime, you do your job...
I agree with the last rash of posts regarding Sin City. Absolutely highest marks for the way it was presented. It perfectly peered into Miller's world of film noir. It's a shame that Hollywood is all politics when it comes to awards.

By the way, how cool would it be to do a Buffy movie completely done in the same fashion as Sin City? I that would be considered Buffy-noir. (I can tell you already, it would get snubbed at the Oscars)
Anything with "Vampire Slayer" in the title is never going to win an Oscar.

And that's because we're too cool for gold. Bastard people.
Just read the LATimes critic on Crash's win. He had this tidbit to say:

"I do not for one minute question the sincerity and integrity of the people who made "Crash," and I do not question their commitment to wanting a more equal society. But I do question the film they've made.... For "Crash's" biggest asset is its ability to give people a carload of those standard Hollywood satisfactions but make them think they are seeing something groundbreaking and daring. It is, in some ways, a feel-good film about racism, a film you could see and feel like a better person, a film that could make you believe that you had done your moral duty and examined your soul when in fact you were just getting your buttons pushed and your preconceptions reconfirmed."

Now, bearing in mind that I liked Crash more than he (Kenneth Turan) did, I still think he captured pretty well what some of my issues with it are. And the reasons why I'm disappointed it won best picture even though I liked it. For my money, Brokeback Mountain was the more-daring, better-made film (as were both Capote and Munich), and I'm disappointed that Crash won out in the end....
ALEXREAGER -- There's a Buffy Season Noir fanfic series....
Spikebad, Sin City got snubbed because it was a comic book movie and obviously therefore not worthy of consideration.

As was History of Violence come to think of it.

And the exception to prove this rule is 'Road to Perdition'.

And Whedonesque.org is a forum not a message board (probably).
Frankly, I'm still stunned the AMPAS not only nominated, but awarded the LOTR in Best Picture. I know, I know...it has a "literary" pedigree in Tolkien, but it's still the dreaded F word. (Fantasy).
Having only seen King Kong out of the many nominated this year, I can't really give an informed opinion of who got snubbed. I do still enjoy the movie-going experience, but this past year films and series on DVD have become a much better fit with my lifestyle. I expect to be seeing a lot of these films in the next few months, though, including the ones mentioned in this discussion that I might have otherwise missed. Thanks, everyone!

I was actually finishing up the final episode of S4 Six Feet Under (!!!) before I remembered the Oscars were on. When I flipped the channel, only to see slo-mo zombie aerobics and flaming cars, the incongruity of what I was expecting vs. where my head was at and what I was seeing made for a pretty surreal few seconds. (Bookended much later by Ang Lee's "I wish I knew how to quit you" quip at the beginning of his acceptance speech, which was a dorkily adorable moment that made me laugh and groan inwardly at the same time.)

Also, put me in the "Dakota Fanning = brilliant, just a little bit scary" camp. I'm waiting for the film where she and Jodie Foster meet and everything in the universe is magnetically sucked into their vortex and silently implodes from the fission of their combined intensities...
A forum and a message board are virtually the same thing, whereas both are distinctly different from a blog.
This article about Crash's PR efforts among Academy and other organizations' voters came to mind. Could sending out more screening copies than anyone else have helped tilt the voting, even though I guess everyone in the Academy got all the films? Or is this related to what Bad Kitty reported, that people were just refusing to watch "a gay movie"? (It sounds like the same elements that determined the last presidential election!) :-(

ETA -- I notice the Kenneth Turan article referenced in today's Los Angeles Times online, that said Crash was only so-so, also mentioned that people might have been put-off from voting for Brokeback because it was about gay people. Welcome to the 19th century! :-(

[ edited by billz on 2006-03-06 23:46 ]
Sin City is one of my top 5 favorite movies of last year, but not one I would expect to get Oscar nominated. Some supporting acting love for Mickey Rourke would have been awesome though, and it would have been nice to have seen it nominated for some of the technical categories. I don't think the comic book pedigree had anything to do with Road to Perdition and A History of Violence getting snubbed. The buzz simply wasn't strong enough on those pictures by the time the nominations came out, and the Oscars gravitate toward buzz.
Most of the themes mentioned, however, are all around us whether the specific story happened in the past, future or across an ocean. In those cases, the movies my be more about understanding the people and the world all around you rather than your life right at the moment but that might make them more valuable in the long run.


I thought that bears repeating. And, maybe, adding: in the past, future or across an ocean ... or on a spaceship.
On a topic probably no one cares about at all....
For the first time ever I actually saw the nominated short films (live-action and animated) this year – some friends and I went to a local showing Saturday night. They were a mixed bag, but had a few real gems. But...
I was outraged that "The Moon and the Son, an Imagined Conversation" won best animated short! It had some interesting, albeit simple, animation, but was for the most part an overly long imagined conversation between a son and his father that should have stayed on the therapy couch. It certainly wasn't meant to be a movie - or at least not in this form. It was all of our second-least favorite short animated film of the bunch.
Six-shooter, on the other hand (the win for live-action) was brilliant. And sick and twisted and quite funny. A violent Irish short by Martin McDonagh, the playwright best known for "Beauty Queen of Lenane." If any of you ever come across a chance to see it, I recommend it....
And the exception to prove this rule is 'Road to Perdition'.

Maybe Tom Hanks should've played the Maria Bello role in 'A History of Violence'. Would've pressed more of the correct Oscar buttons.

acp for all that i've said before in defence of Crash I think there's some truth to the critic's views about preconceptions confirmed. Maybe it is more uplifting than the subject matter deserves to be (tho' to me if it gets people talking about racism and what constitutes a racist then job's a good 'un). But I have to level the same charge against Munich. Though I enjoyed it (and thought Eric Bana - one of my original snubs - was amazing as were Ciaran Hinds and Geoffrey Rush) it seemed totally non-committal on the subject at the centre of its story, instead merely confirming what i'd say most right thinking people already knew. Violence corrupts, rarely solves anything and is messy and chaotic. Oh and Palestinians are people too. Wow, stop the presses. As i've said in other threads I also found it a bit unengaging on an emotional level, a problem i've had with every 'serious' Spielberg movie post Schindler's List (apart from the first half hour of the, IMO, hugely overrated and occassionally offensive Saving Private Ryan).

(and Whedonesque.org is definitely a web site. Almost definitely anyway)
Sin City got snubbed because it was a comic book movie and obviously therefore not worthy of consideration.

As was History of Violence come to think of it.

Come on Simon, that's not true. I mean, Christ, I heard Dustin Hoffman utter the words "graphic novel" onscreen at the Oscars this year. There's little to no inherent bias against comic books.

There is, however, a Hollywood bias against intentional hamminess, and Sin City has that in spades. The Academy only rewards unintentional hamminess. Hence, Crash.
Fair enough, Saje. I think those are probably accurate criticisms to level at Munich (although I'm glad it didn't take a definite stand on the conflict at the center of the story, simply because that would just polarize audiences who are already far too polarized). I guess too often even the most "daring" movies are only daring to a point – they question the things we're all (or mostly all) already willing to question.
acp, I think the nominated shorts are available at the iTunes store. ???
ETA -- heh, double-posted, but here's new info to write about: Arabchick, the Kenneth Turan article also mentioned "Paradise Now" as a film that might have been affected by politics (although he lists the country as "Palestinian Territories").

[ edited by billz on 2006-03-07 00:17 ]

And Whedonesque.org is a forum not a message board (probably).


Wait, Simon... is that why it got snubbed at the oscars??
I think the nominated shorts are available at the iTunes store.

Cool! I just checked, and they are, partly. The live-action ones were the only ones I could find. But if anyone wants to check a few out, Six-Shooter and Cashback were both great, and only $1.99...
acp -- Two words: See CAPOTE. There is a film that takes a definite stand on its subject. When I left that film, I felt depressed, slightly "dirty" and the effect stayed with me for days. That film dared to present a gay protagonist -- whose gayness was tangential to the story at best -- but was ABOUT so much more. The more I think about it - much as I loved Crash -- the more I think Capote deserved to win.
As far as LOTR getting nominated and actually winning goes, in my mind it was recognition of the mammoth effort of such an undertaking, and having it turn out so beautifully. It surpassed the usual expectations of 'genre' by a long, long way.
Having seen only one movie last year (albeit 5 times), I'm now qualified to comment on this.
Man, you must've really liked Wallace and Gromit CiV.

Oh, wait, nevermind.
The What The Hell Is Going On award should go to war of the worlds. WHAT THE HELL WAS GOING ON.
Terrorists Aliens.
Lead Actor - Eric Bana in Munich
Supporting Actor - Ciarán Hinds in Munich
Best Picture - Munich
Best Director - Munich

It is a crying shame that this movie was slammed by so many with political axes to grind. On both sides of the conflict. Munich is nothing short of genius.

P.S. Brokeback Mountain should've beaten Crash.
Roman Osin for Cinematography in "Pride and Prejudice"
Great classic photography like an old David Lean movie.
I prefer the BBC 5 hour version, but visually, this was absolutely beautiful.
I thought War of the Worlds was one long advert for Beechams Cold Remedy.
Joss said that everyone was to weigh in on this subject. Caroline, can a thread have over 3672 comments? Because it looks headed that way. Good to see some lurkers posting.
While I didn't necessarily disagree with any of the nominations (and in the case of "Best Actor" I couldn't decide for the life of me who I wanted to win - I was hoping for a five-way tie), here are the few I wish could have gotten a nod:

Tilda Swinton for Best Supporting Actress in "The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe". She was truly terrifying and didn't even allow for an ounce of sympathy. Evil incarnate. It was kind of hot.

Anne Hathaway for Best Supporting Actress in "Brokeback Mountain". While I thought Michelle Williams was very good in it, I believe Anne gave the second strongest and most nuanced performance in the film next to Heath Ledger.

Judd Apatow and Steve Carrell for Best Original Screenplay for "The 40 Year Old Virgin". One of the funniest films I've seen in a long time, and nothing is harder to write than comedy. Especially comedy with a good story and characters you actually care about. I thought it was brilliant writing.
And how about a lifetime achievement award for Don Knotts!!!
How 'bout sendin' some love Barney's way? Last chance, and yet...
"The Ghost and Mr. Chicken" ?? -totally snubbed yet again this year! :)
Att'a boy Luther!!!
Rosario Dawson for RENT. She wrings meaning and passion out of every syllable. Blew me away...

Yeah, she was great in Rent...but she ROCKED in Sin City. I think she should have gotten an Oscar nomination just for wearing the hell out of that costume. If I had that body, I'd wear that costume to the grocery store.

(And can Wilson and Jesse get "Best Couple?")

Anyone else cry their eyes out? Hands? Anyone? Or was it just me?

Lifetime Achievement: Dakota Fanning. I'm sort of not kidding.

That little girl can act her ass off. (Anyone see Sci-Fi Channel's Taken? Oh.My.God.) But let's hold off on the "Lifetime" achievement thing until she's actually put a few more years in. :)
Funny, Saje!

Did my best to muster folks out to Serenity...we all did...damn.
acp -- Two words: See CAPOTE.

Oh don't worry, Miss Edith – I did. And I loved it. In fact, that was really my favorite of the five nominees, and the one I thought was the "best" film, though not really in the Academy's usual best-picture style, so not one I really expected to win. But I would have been thrilled if it had... And I've been so happy for Phillip Seymour Hoffman that he's gotten so much well-deserved acclaim this year for that role. He's always a great actor, but has never had a leading role like this to work with before, and man did he shine.
I would like to add something to my Sin City post earlier.

When they started playing the film noir montage I cursed my ass off at the tv. "You're playing a ******* film noir montage yet you didn't nominate Sin City for a single ******* award. **** you, you Son's of *******."

Yeah. It sort of went something like that. And you've gotta give props to Robert Rodriguez for sticking it to the DGA. I just love the bad asses of hollywood. And I do agree, with someone else that I know, that Russel Crow should've hit someone. That would have greatly improved my evening. You don't mess with Maximus. "My name is Gladiator."
Word on Miranda July for Me and You and Everyone We Know (actress/screenplay/director, mainly the latter). For actress, she could've had Dame Judi's (or to a lesser extent, Charlize's) spot.

And Peter Saarsgaard for Jarhead over George Clooney for Syriana, the least deserved of the nominations in supporting actor (god, we all know he just won so they could send him home with something).

I also would've nominated Kate Mara for Brokeback Mountain, Tracie Thoms (Wonderfalls!) for Rent (she stole it!), or Rosario Dawson for Sin City for supporting actress. Michelle Williams and Amy Adams (hee, a 'verse alum!) both got robbed. Weisz wasn't impressive at all.

I'm impressed with all the best actor nominees, but I feel that if anything should've been nominated for Munich, it was Eric Bana. He was fantastic in a mediocre film.

And I'm not even gonna get started on Catherine Keener. Should've been nominated for 40 Year Old Virgin (along with Steve Carell in like a 6th spot), not Capote where she was good but totally marginalized to nodding and looking concerned. and Serenity and 40 y-o Virgin should've been nominated for their respective (adapted and original) screenplay categories.

And Joss Whedon for best overlord. because...mmm, Joss is sex.

[Edited to add about 50 capital letters. It's not always internet convention, but it is Whedonesque policy. Thanks.]

[ edited by SoddingNancyTribe on 2006-03-07 05:29 ]
And Joss, dude. Chiwetel was amazing in Serenity and Dirty Pretty Things (mmmm, Tautou...), but Jake Gyllenhaal has a lock on that category...Proof, Brokeback, Jarhead, and being the only man who could make me not be straight. Besides the aforementioned Joss.

[Edited to add capital letters]

[ edited by SoddingNancyTribe on 2006-03-07 05:30 ]
So now we have a category for Best Overlord. How about Best Performance by a Blogger Message Boarder Website Posting Person?

By the way, how cool would it be to do a Buffy movie completely done in the same fashion as Sin City?

The only way that would work is if the women are fully clothed and tough-talking and the men were blood-thirsty killers who traipsed around naked.

??? Wait...
The only way that would work is if the women are fully clothed and tough-talking and the men were blood-thirsty killers who traipsed around naked.

??? Wait...


*Laughs a lot* Wait, what's funny...?
I was SOOOO dissapointed Sin City was nominated for at least Art Direction!!!
Constant Gardener should have been nominated for best picture as should have Kong.
I was not just disappointed, but a wee bit appalled that the truly amazing 'Hustle & Flow' did not win more awards, like, um best director??? Best screenplay??? Best actor for the preternaturally seductive Terrence Howard??? Grrr...
Oh shit...did I seriously not see any film in the theaters last year besides Serenity?

I'm a complete and utter failure to the entertainment industry.
The talented half of the Baldwin brothers is Alec and Adam, right?
As usual, I'm way too late to the party, too. Oh well, here goes for my wish-they-had-been-nominated:

Grizzly Man - Best Documentary (fascinating study, I thought)
Cache - Best Foreign Film (I LOVED this movie)
Match Point - Best Actor

I loved Capote. Philip Seymour Hoffman seriously rocked. I've loved him in everything I've ever seen him do. I thought Brokeback Mountain was a beautiful movie. Crash? I can't make up my mind how I feel about it in the end. On one level, it engaged and haunted me and I liked how each person alternatively wore Black and White Hats. Like, you know, we human beings tend to do. Matt Dillon? Amazing bit of work in my opinion. But I also felt that Crash was heavy-handed and cloddishly obvious to the point that it embarrassed me at times.

I haven't seen Rent or History of Violence, plus a slew of other films, so my commentary isn't complete. Jon Stewart? He's a very funny, clever man, but I felt that he dimmed his lights a bit last night. He was good, but not great.

But seriously, folks, I know that Serenity is out of the running in this wish-they-woulda game, but I so loved it. Surely we can sneak it in in some fashion?
Definitely Steve Carrell for 40-Year Old Virgin. That role could've been played a dozen different ways, with most of them playing towards the lowest common denomenator of comedy. But Carrell found the absolutely perfect balance for the character--earnest without being schmaltzy, crass without being gutteral. He deserves all the kudos he's received and many, many that he did not.

Oh, and he kicks butt on "The Office," too.
I'm in Australia so my timing is off from the academy's (I'm in love with Reece now but it's 2006), but my three best films of 2005 were 1) Me and you and everyone we know 2) Mysterious skin and 3) Look both ways (which I think only opens in America this week). I think these were all astounding and important films, please everybody see them.

[ edited by Caroline for punctuation and capitalisation on 2006-03-07 11:41 ]
(1) Gustavo Santaolalla winning best score for Brokeback is just stupid. It's an above average score at best, pleasant but nothing special. All of the other nominated scores are better than this.
(2) Naomi Watts definitely should have been nominated for Kong.
(3) I was very suprised when Crash won. I haven't seen it yet so I can't really comment but my hunch was that it should still have gone to Brokeback.
(4) Munich is a very fine film (and I am a bit of a Spielberg fan here), but I'm not at all suprised it didn't win.
(5) Reese and Rachel Weisz won. Fine by me
(6) George Clooney is a smart guy, and his speech was great.
(7) I agree that Sin City could have perhaps been nominated in some technical categories.
(8) I'm thirsty.
Since I haven't seen anything (except Serenity x4; P&P; and any and all kids movies this year) I am nominating Toni Collette for 'Japanese Story' because I finally saw it last night. Wow. And it looks like it was a snub, unless I'm not googling the right year.
Sorry I'm three years behind, but that's my movie-viewing life right now.
I think my kids would nominate 'Zathura' for the Best Smashing Up of a House award.
I think WannaBlessedBe has a point, especially with #8 :)
Personally I don't know how Joaquin Phoenix didn't win for best actor in his role as the legendary Johnny Cash in WALK THE LINE. After I saw the movie I went into full research mode and JP completely nailed Cash to a 't'. From his voice to his movements to his singing to everything.

Some members had mentioned Grizzly Man for the fox scenes. *sigh* As I was watching all I was thinking about is "I want a pet fox how do you go about getting a little pet fox without the ending to this movie?"
When they started playing the film noir montage I cursed my ass off at the tv. "You're playing a ******* film noir montage yet you didn't nominate Sin City for a single ******* award. **** you, you Son's of *******."


That's because they were doing an homage to classic, not neo (or nouveau) noir.
If you notice, it was Lauren Bacall (bless her heart--she wasn't "out of it"...she's EIGHTY ONE and trying to read a tele-prompter!) that intro'd the piece, and none of the films were made past the 1950s.
I liked it. And I liked Stewarts little ironic jab afterwards about how it would have been a better montage had it only been in colour.
When I was little, at least on TV in San Francisco, these classic movies were shown on TV. It was where I first saw them. Too bad the networks can't drop a classic film bomb on us every once-in-a-while. Didn't there used to be a Sunday Night Movies on ABC--or was it CBS--back in that day?
: )

[ edited by AmazonGirl on 2006-03-07 17:12 ]

[ edited by AmazonGirl on 2006-03-08 07:07 ]
The talented half of the Baldwin brothers is Alec and Adam, right?
Adam is in no way related to the rest of the Baldwins, so that joke did not concern him. Whether Stephen or William is the other talented Baldwin brother (besides Alec), I'll leave that one to the judges.
. . . and isn't there another Baldwin by the name of Daniel, who played Beau Felton on one of my fave shows, Homicide: Life on the Street?

Great thread, you all.
There is m'cookies. But after seeing Paparazzi it's impossible for me to even consider him as being better than any of his brothers.
Oh, I'm not comparing relative Baldwin worth at all - merely trying to update the inventory of ALL the boys from Massepequa.

I'm out of the loop. All I saw on the big screen last year was Serenity umpteen times, Rent (yay Rosario's emoting, and double yay, Tracie Thoms' singing!!), and unfortunately, WOTW, during which all I could do was think about Tom Cruise and his post-partum depression and psychiatry expertise.
Wow - three more posts and we'll be at 400. That's gotta be a record....

Seriously, I second m'cookies comments on the quality of the thread. I always knew Joss fans had good taste that extended well beyond BtVS and Firefly, but it's great to read such thoughtful comments about this year's films, both mainstream and decidedly indie.
And now I have at least a few more films on my list to check out: Breakfast on Pluto, Paradise Now (which I meant to see in theaters, but it left too quickly), Japanese Story, Mysterious Skin, 2046, and The Upside of Anger (I'm trusting you on this one, Joss. 'Cause I really hate Kevin Costner....)

[ edited by acp on 2006-03-07 20:07 ]
acp - Kevin Costner was suprisingly good in the Upside of Anger. I usually can't stand him but he was actually fantastic in Upside AND he played the socks off of his role. I was so shocked because usually he's been so arrogant and smarmy in some of his other roles. Joan Allen was quite good but I would have to hand the best acting chops in that film to Costner. It actually made me like him.
Whoa, I believe (nearly) 400 posts is an all time record for us.
I don't even think the Serenity premiere thread got this many hits.
Reading this thread is making me thirsty too.

Also: Word, ruthless1, its the only Costner performance I've really enjoyed, and of course Joan Allen is magnificent.

And; Dude, The Squid & The Whale!!! (Sorry).

ETA: Wow, was mine the 400th comment? Cool.

[ edited by The Devil's Robot on 2006-03-07 21:46 ]
"I want a pet fox how do you go about getting a little pet fox without the ending to this movie?"

It still might be possible, because it wasn't the foxes who ate him and his girlfriend. My kids kept wishing they could have a pet fox after seeing Grizzly Man. We have foxes in our neighborhood. I wonder if we can lure them into our yard with food without attracting possums, raccoons, stray cats and dogs.

Actually - that could be kind of cool, except if there are also bears around here.

Are we up to 400 yet? I think I might be 401.
Yeah, MySerenity, I believed the 'Serenity' thread topped out around 340 comments. I'm a fast reader, but it still took me nearly a hour to read through this link. Excellent comments from all. What a wonderful room.
Pomeranians look like foxes and are already more or less domesticated...

This is not a movie from this year, but since it was touched on briefly less than 400 posts ago I thought I would give an update. I watched I heart Huckabees last night. It was, as someone here said, extremely strange. I was glad I kept my son away from it for various reasons. I was not bored, however. It seems like a movie that would be a miracle to get made. Not sure I'm interested enough to watch with the commentary even though I love commentaries. Got to think about that one.
I just went and had a quick look, 'cause I'm kinda sad like that, and I think the longest thread on Whedonesque was the preview screenings thread in June with 535 coments. however 400+ is still very impressive!
We had several pet raccoons when I was a kid (all orphaned and brought to us by various people who knew we had experience with them). Not quite the same as the fox in Grizzly Man, but still incredibly cute, especially when they're babies....
Pomeranians don't have fox tails and don't move as gracefully as foxes.

We've only had rescued rabbits, kittens, and birds.

The other night, when I was putting out the recyclables for collection, something growled at me from under a bush. I ran inside the house and decided not to go out again. There is no danger of me ever being Grizzly Woman.
Oh, gosh, vera. You're right, completely missed that one. Me and my silly brain cells. We never get along.

acp, what's this with the racoons? If you ask me, this will forever be a better story than that Hollywood nightmare of a show. Do say, acp.
I've been out of town and unable to read this all yet (or even watch the show, which awaits me on DVR), but just in case anyone's still reading, my shout out is too the probably-already-mentioned-many-times Naomi Watts. She was definitely doing Oscar caliber stuff in "Kong" -- a truly amazing piece of work. However, I'd say she was even better in the little seen "Elle Parker."

The movie itself is highly watcheable, but really more of a rough draft than a finished film, but Ms. Watt's performance's is one of the most hilarious-yet-kinda-sad performances I've ever seen. And no one looks cuter impersonating a kangaroo than her.
Not even going to TRY to read this entire thread (good lord people!!!)... but I simply cannot let the dissin gof Gustavo Santolalla's Brokeback Mountain score go unaddressed. I was deeply, deeply moved by the music sitting in that theater all three times I saw the film. And I've continued to be moved by it each and every single time I've listened to it since then (approximately a gazillion times, give or take.) Truly, this was my favorite award of the evening.

Oh, and Mirrormask most definitely needed some nods. Neil for best original screenplay perhaps? Some technical/SFX nominations as well, methinks.
Not much to tell, madhatter (and I'm cracking up that we've made it to pet raccoons and pomeranians, somewhere around post 400...). Living out in the woods and with parents who knew a lot about wildlife, we just often ended up being sort of "go-to" people when there were orphaned animals. Though the first pet raccoon came about when a baby was orphaned right next to our home. We raised him, and gradually let him have more and more freedom, so that by the end as an adult he was essentially living in the wild but would come back occasionally for treats or to play. And as a baby, boy was he cute!
Also, quite a few other random assorted pets: snakes, lizards, mice, tarantula, flying squirrels... 'twas a bit of a zoo :-)
But I agree that the fox in Grizzly Man was completely adorable.
acp, I had a racoon in my life, too. Unbeknownst to my mother, my dad had said OK to babysitting one for his friend. Living in Alaska at the time, we had this really cool (to kids) dirt basement. We used to dig out thrones and tunnels etc...

Anyway, the coon ended up biting my brother (no rabies, thankfully), and he would escape the basement and wreak havoc in the house, opening the fridge and the cupboards and making a huge mess of everything. He also found the litter box quite amusing.He did all the naughty stuff that Disney movies show. But it wasn't funny at all when you had to clean it up.

Suffice it to say, my mom threw a huge fit and "Coony" (how original, right?) was back at the 'friend's' house real quick. A corny story, but it's true.
Ahhh, what's a pomeranians? Not in my Websters.

Hi, Willowy. Thought you be all over this one.
Yeah, I think coons aren't such good indoor pets. Ours ("Twinkie") became outdoor-only very quickly – better anyways since we were trying to gradually reintroduce him to the wild. And the others were all outdoor-only too. They're definitely mischevious little buggers - and sounds like yours wreaked total havoc, Willowy! Ours played endless games with our dog, which was a riot. And the sprinkler.
I think pomeranians are a kind of dog. Someone mentioned them up above because they look (a little bit) like foxes....
In case anyone sees this, yes Pomeranians are dogs and I was doing my half kidding thing when I mentioned them. Though there are advantages to having a dog vs. a wild animal for a pet, especially if, like 99% of the people in the lower 48, you don't know much about raising wild animals.

We rescued animals occasionally when I was a kid. The area was more rural than it is now. My mom still talks about the injured grouse I walked through the front door with when I was like 7.

The Racoons always had a strange relationship with us though. I rescued the babies out of garbage cans occasionally and my cat seemed to be friends with them (and with a skunk who I found asleep in our kitchen one night.) I had an upstairs bedroom with my bed by a dormer window. Every so often I would turn out the lights and turn to the window to find myself face to face with a racoon who had apparently been watching me. He/she seemed to find me entertaining. It usually gave me quite a start and delayed my going to sleep by a few minutes while I waited for the adrenaline to settle. ;-)
MICKEY ROURKE ! In SIN CITY . Terrific work ! He nailed the role !

Also , Robert Rodriguez for Sin City , in a # of categories .
But , we all know that isn't likely to happen in the near future . Due to Hollywoods disdain for rebels who don't play by studio rules .

More power to him . FIGHT THE POWER !

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